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Library Matters

Library Matters is a podcast by Montgomery County Public Libraries exploring the world of books, libraries, technology, and learning.
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Library Matters is a podcast of Montgomery County Public Libraries (MCPL) in Montgomery County, MD. Each episode we explore the world of books, libraries, technology, and learning. Library Matters is hosted by Julie Dina, Outreach Associate, Lauren Martino, Children's Librarian at our Silver Spring branch, and David Payne, Branch Manager of our Davis branch. 

Oct 10, 2017

Listen to the audio.

Adrienne Miles Holderbaum (producer):  Welcome to Library Matters, the Montgomery County Public Libraries’ podcast.

 

Julie Dina:  Welcome to Montgomery County Public Libraries’ Library Matters podcast. I’m Julie Dina, one of the new hosts along with Lauren Martino and David Payne. In this episode, Lauren and David enjoy a lively discussion about Game of Thrones with two staff members who are fans of the books and show. We have a bonus feature at the end. A brief talk with Acting Director, Anita Vassallo, another Game of Thrones fan who couldn't make the main recording, but didn't want to be left out of the fun.

 

David Payne:  Welcome to Library Matters with your host Lauren Martino.

 

Lauren Martino:  Hello.

 

David Payne:  And myself David Payne. Today we’ll be talking about a fantasy epic that has become a cultural phenomenon since it first appeared in print over two decades ago taking place in settings where magic joints and dragons exist. You may be forgiven for thinking we are referring to Harry Potter. It is in fact Game of Thrones that we will be discussing a world that began with the publication of George Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series in the mid 1990s and has continued with his subsequent adaptation into a fantasy drama series on television, which has attracted record viewing figures all over the world.

 

Here to tell us all about the intriguing world of Game of Thrones, I'm very pleased to welcome two MCPL staff members who come to claused as Game of Thrones devotees Susan Moritz and Angelica Rengifo. Before we go any further however, as we delve deeply into the Game of Thrones world, please note there will be spoilers in this conversation. If you're not up-to-date on Game of Thrones and wish to avoid spoilers, do come back to us after you’ve caught up to the most recent Game of Thrones episodes. So welcome Susan and Angelica.

 

Susan Moritz:  Hello.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Hello, thank you.

 

Lauren Martino:  So David and I have never seen any Game of Thrones shows or read any of the books. So how would you describe this world and why should we be interested?

 

Susan Moritz: Well, it’s sort of hard to – it’s so such a vast and exciting world that’s hard to break it down into one little – [Multiple Speakers].

 

Lauren Martino:  Come on in 30 seconds.

 

Susan Moritz:  In 30 seconds what can I say? So I guess I want to say that it was that it’s like a medieval fantasy and its set in the fictional land of Westeros and there are seven kingdoms that are ruled by one king, exactly.

 

Lauren Martino:  One king to rule them all.

 

Susan Moritz:  One king to rule them all, exactly, exactly very much like Lord of the Rings-esc. And it’s sort of what happens when the king is accidently killed during a boar hunting accident, but he is really murdered of course.

 

Lauren Martino:  Freak boar hunting accident.

 

Susan Moritz:  Freak boar hunting accident, exactly, exactly. How would that have ever happened? You know, so of course, it sends this fragile piece that sort of kept these seven sort of separate kingdoms together basically falls apart. And vast chaos and everyone decides that they want to be king and who wants to sit in the iron throne, do you think that’s right Angelica, are there other things that I missed?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I’ll say that definitely it looks very medieval.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  It’s fantasy. We have dragons, we have magic, we have dead people that come back to life.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, White Walkers exactly.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, and also like for example the Dondarrion that is brought back to life by Thoros of Myr. We also have a lot of sex, a lot of backstabbing, we had a politics and a lot of complicatid family ties.

 

David Payne:  Sounds like you’re ever things is there.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Lauren Martino: Downton Abbey?

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, I think it was funny like I watching the show until like the very last I think it was the very last episode or the second to last episode of the season I sort of didn't realize it had this sort of fantasy element to it. And it just sort of looked I mean, even though it was set in a fictional fantasy world it sort of just looked very medieval, very King Arthur-esc kind of time period.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And the big bull have happened.

 

Susan Moritz:  But then these dragons get hatched.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes,

 

Susan Moritz: And there was like wait, there is dragons here. So then I was like, wait, I think this is a little bit more even more fantasy, magic kind of stuff that I was thinking it would be as.

 

David Payne:  So do you think one has to have a sense of or appreciation of history to enjoy the series or does it not matter?

 

Susan Moritz:  I don’t think it matters, I mean, I –.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, we can say – I can say from personal experience I have never been into fantasy. I have never been into Harry Potter or anything like that until I started watching and reading A Song of Ice and Fire.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, this is perfect because I have been a fan of you know historically fiction and history and fantasy like Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter. So I think this is great. It shows that you can like and no matter you feel like this if your thing or not.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I’m definitely into history and I love my favorite movies have like Trilogy have been the Lord of the Rings, but I’d never like Harry Potter. And this show, even the TV show, it's really great and the production is so great.

 

Lauren Martino:  Why do you think it has attracted such a wide fan base? What makes it appealing to fans of so many different completely different people that all like the same thing?

 

Susan Moritz:  I would say that sort of my two criteria for any like great TV show or movie or books is it’s got to have a good plot and it has a great plot. It has these twists and these turns and I remember even after that I was hooked by the very first episode, some marginal TV show that takes you while to get into, but I was like this whole like plot twist at the end where you find out that the Queen is sleeping with her twin brother.

 

Lauren Martino:  What?

 

Susan Moritz:  And yes, exactly, exactly. And where the beloved Starks because I love the Stark family, you know, accidently one of the kids sees them and it’s like and her brothers like “the things I do for love” and pushes him out of the tower you think to his death. He winds up surviving, but you’re like, but it ends with him like falling out of the tower and you’re like, oh, my god, what’s going to happen next. So I think it’s got a great plot with these surprising twists and it just has great characters like you really like with the Starks you really love them.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Susan Moritz:  You’re just so invested what is going to happen and what’s going to happen next. Are they going to get justice? Are they going to get back together, they’re going as a unit as a family unit. And the other thing is there is characters that you hate so badly that you hope that something horrible, horrible, horrible happens to them.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, you hope that something horrible happen to them. And the one of the thing that I have to say about the characters too is just because you sometimes think you know them like there is definitely characters I love and characters I hate. But there is ones that you feel like that change like Jamie Lannister, I think we had talked about that about how starts off he is the one the brother of the Queen who pushes his kid. You think this is the most horrible guy ever. He is sleeping with his twin sister. He has pushed this little boy.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And he is full of himself. He is – he thinks he is entitled to everything, and he doesn’t care. He has no care for anybody besides his sister not even his father I mean, he is afraid of his father in some way or another. But I want to bring up the point that you said that you got hooked on the first episode of the show. I didn't.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, you didn’t?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, how funny. How funny. I was totally hooked of that first episode.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, it took me a while. I tried to watch the first episode three times and I couldn't get pass I don’t know it was too much.

 

David Payne:  So what make you go back?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Just the fact that it was history and everybody was talking about it. And like yeah, it has a history and then I got into the books and also I didn’t know it like it was always present in my mind that I have to watch this, I have to watch this. And that’s what I tell everybody because that's what I experience when I get friends to like try to watch it I tell them, don't give up on the first and second episodes.

 

Lauren Martino:  And that’s hard you have to stick with it.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes, push through because like that’s what happened to me. I had to push through and like actually sit down and say, I'm going to finish this first episode. I’m going to finish this second episode.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, there is definitely payoffs. There is definitely payoffs for sticking with the series like, these are like the characters like change like with Jamie like you hate him in the very beginning. The Queen’s brother like he is this horrible guy. And then he like he himself suffers a tragedy he is like in order to help out Brienne I mean his swordhand gets cut off. And he basically has to relearn how to like so of course this is very important, but you know, he totally got to be good and he has got these good qualities. And you've just totally in the first episode of written him off as this horrible murderer, that’s a horrible guy.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Because he has to learn to be him without being a fighter. That was his personality and his worth was that he was able – he was the best sword man in the kingdom. And when that his hand gets cut off he cannot put value on himself and does what he like almost dies when he was being brought to the, what was it?, back to south, yeah.

 

David Payne:  So, you talked about the TV series. How would you compare it to the books I mean, having read the books and seen the show, which one do you, do you both prefer?

 

Susan Moritz:  I like both, would you say that you like both too?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I like both because I like the books because he goes, George R. R. Martin, goes into so much detail describing the landscape, describing people, describing the thoughts of the characters. And also I like the show because you can put a face to the characters that you have been reading about. And the other thing is that like after season five they go on a different like a different direction than the books do.

 

Lauren Martino:  Really so they diverge.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes. And there are a lot of plots like side plots that do not get the attention or not even mention on the TV show that you find on the books. Like for example, the Dorn plot with the sand, snakes, and the daughter of the King of Dorn it's a really great plot in the books. And on the TV show it’s a side plot is a – we are losing time watching this because it doesn't go anywhere.

 

Susan Moritz:  I would totally agree with that and that’s exact same thing I was thinking about like there is this Kingdom of Dorn, one of the kingdoms. And then in the TV show it was like, oh, we’re going to include it and then it was like oh, no, wait, we've got so much, so much we got to go.

 

Lauren Martino:  Back up.

 

Susan Moritz:  We’ve got a range that. And exactly pack up exactly, exactly. And I like the way that I started with it too like I watched the first season. So they’re having – and then I read the books and I read all the way through. And so I was thinking that you know, it's like I already have these images in my head, this is this character, this is this. And you already had that sort of intro to it so you’re not like overwhelmed by detail or stuff with the books like who is this and what’s this again and you’re already sort of ready to jump on. But now since George R. R. Martin is not writing fast enough the show has gone past the books. So basically the show is now all we have now that you’re going to write all the books like that’s – that’s all you got left now.

 

David Payne:  Has it become too complicated?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, I like it. So like even the reading and the books are great, yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, I don’t think it’s become too complicated, but I think it’s probably become too complicated for George R. R. Martin to write.

 

Lauren Martino: And one person is not enough anymore

 

Susan Moritz: Definitely, and it was like with his thing apparently he doesn’t, unlike I think JK Rowling, does not outline anything. So he just like, so his got it like 1000 page books. And so he just sort of like has this huge world with all these characters and it’s like then he used to write, write, write.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And he writes chapters. So each chapter is a character and it’s the point of view of the character. But I’ve heard I don't know if it's true that he has hired someone to get whatever he see his mind in draft.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, my goodness. I love that.

 

David Payne:  Well, I have to ask Game of Thrones was described to me as "Shakespeare's history plays with dragons”. Now I don’t know how familiar you are with Shakespeare’s history plays, but any thoughts on the comparison?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I do not agree with that.

 

Susan Moritz:  You don’t.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I don’t.

 

Susan Moritz:  I would totally say that I would agree. Yeah, do you want to do the con and then I’ll do the pro.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  So I don't agree with that even though Shakespeare has written about Richard III and The Wars of the Roses it's still a play. He doesn't develop something new. He doesn't develop the characters. We don't know the depth of the characters. So I feel like he is about comparison and he is not fair to George R. R. Martin, because again we can go back to the fact that two of the plays by Shakespeare are based on kings that went through or where became kings after The Wars of the Roses. And A Song of Ice and Fire is based on The Wars of the Roses. And so, but it has more depth. You can definitely take sides.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, definitely.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  You cannot do that on a play. So I feel like no, I do not agree with that. I think that’s great.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, I didn't realize about The Wars of the Roses that does bring an interesting element into it. And I guess what I thinking of that Shakespeare like history of plays I was thinking of sort of the characters and sort of like sort of similarities kind of thing. And I was thinking in Henry V like one of my – one of the great lines as I and I’m pretty sure hope everything and hope I’ve got all my Shakespeare all coordinated my brain. But uneasy lies the head that wears the crown. And I feel about –.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  You think.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, yes and then in this show it has been uneasy for every single person even the king who was the King Robert Baratheon you know when the show starts the kings before them that his king –.

 

Lauren Martino:  Before the freak boar hunting accident.

 

Susan Moritz:  Before yeah, yeah, when there was the mad king before him that was burning people a lot. No, I mean, it’s been since then and anybody else who has come in it’s been very uneasy.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Very dead.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes and so I see, yes. So I see that I definitely see that. I also see with sort of Henry V that sort of like band of brothers, everybody together, I sort of see that and sort of in Jon Snow and Dany sort of the inspiration the people who follow them they're just so inspired by them and they’re really dedicated to sort of how Henry V was with that. I just see different things with different ones. On Henry IV, you know, overtook the throne from I think it was Richard II and about how like, it was the whole like divine right of kings, and this is this and even in this.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  But in plays that you don’t get developed.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, that’s true.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  That’s what I feel, but it’s not similar. They’re not similar because the characters do not get developed. You don't feel like they have personality. Everything that we know about the characters in Shakespeare plays is what we know from history. What we have read in other things, not from Shakespeare himself.

 

Susan Moritz:   There is only so much room to expand to change what’s there.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Whereas George R. R. Martin has been whatever he wants to do.

 

Lauren Martino:  Yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Right, yeah they definitely doesn’t have the depth I would say you’re writing the characters and then with Shakespeare he was probably writing for Queen Elizabeth II. I want to make sure that everybody sort of hey, that’s her that came out looking pretty good and Richard III of course was not going to look good at all. Although, I hear conflicting reports about that how he was in the real life there so.

 

David Payne:  It sounds like you both know your Shakespeare.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, well that’s good, yes.

 

David Payne:  So a quick aside for initiated like Lauren and myself. What is the thought of Game of Thrones, what does that allude to?

 

Susan Moritz:  I think it’s the Game of Thrones. I just think of the line that Cersei Lannister whose the Queen says to Ned Stark it’s like “when you play the Game of Thrones, you either win or you die.” So basically when you're trying to gain the throne you either going to win and you’re going to get on that, you’re going to get to on the iron throne. They got this iron throne with that’s basically melted of swords right from I think the people who they call bend the knee, you’re pledging your oath to you know your allegiance to this person. So they’ve got this like iron throne that you sit on which obviously looks very uncomfortable.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  It was on parks and rec.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, well, why is this, that’s right, that’s right.

 

Lauren Martino:  She gave Ben his own Iron Throne. It was this big, that was the best present he ever got in the whole world that is also I’ve tried.

 

Susan Moritz:  No, no, no and that’s I totally forgot about that and you totally reminded me of about I think I heard that the Queen, the current Queen actually got to visit the set and of course they were like oh, do you want to go sit on. And she is like oh, no, no. And I was like smart lady, I can do imagine –.

 

Lauren Martino:  Don’t allow yourself with that.

 

Susan Moritz:  Exactly, exactly.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And also now that you bring up the throne prequels books that came before song of Ice and Fire there is a King, a Targaryen, that used to sit on the throne and he will get cut because again it’s made of real swords. It’s not just like not swords that are not going to cut your or whatever.

 

Susan Moritz:  So it’s uneasy the bum that sits on the iron throne, not just head with the crown there so.

 

Lauren Martino:  Exactly. So now, you’ve peaked my interest MCPL has all of these items I can go back to my branch and I can either order the season one or I can order the audio book or I can order the print book

 

Angelica Rengifo: or download the audiobook.

 

Lauren Martino:  Or download the electronic audiobook. So which would you recommend, what should I go do?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Oh, I prefer you to read.

 

Lauren Martino:  To read the actual book.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Lauren Martino:  Do the book and not the TV show and not the audio book.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yeah, I’ll prefer the story maybe for someone who does not have an idea of it like Susan said, watch the show so you know who are the characters and you have an idea of who is who and where they are and where they come from and you can put a face when you.

 

Lauren Martino:  Quick introduction.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, and I think it’s great too if you’re not too much into like the sex and the violence and stuff. Having watched the first season and then read through all the books I was prepared for like seasons two through I guess five about anything bad that was coming up. So I sort of knew I was like okay, I’m going to go this scene is coming up in the show. I’m going to go to the kitchen. I’m going back and I’ll be little back right here. So that to me was very helpful knowing it was coming down the pike there. One of the funniest things I think about it is like there is a huge character death. I mean, when you first see it, you’re just like oh, Ned Stark. He is this Sean Bean because I love Lord of the Rings and Sean Bean was in there.

 

Lauren Martino:  Oh Sean Bean.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Lauren Martino:  Sean Bean dies?

 

Angelica Regifo:  Yes and like in every movie.

 

Lauren Martino:  Yes, I know, I know.

 

Susan Moritz:  Because it was like the second to last episodes of season one. And I was like oh, no, at the last minute no, no, no.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  So and then this is the third season, second season when Catelyn Stark dies and Robb Stark and you’re like.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, The Big Red Wedding. And what I loved about that was like so I knew it was coming.

 

Lauren Martino:  The Big Red Wedding.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, it’s The Red Wedding.

 

Lauren Martino:  Because everyone dies?

 

Susan Martino: Two of the main characters you love die. And you think they're all okay, because there is just the guest rights. You come in. You’ve eaten from, if I’ve come to your home and you fed me some food that I'm okay, but it didn't and they turned on them and went up killing them. And if you need a laugh they have YouTube videos of people who knew what was coming and videotape the people around them who are watching.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes, I’ve watched those on YouTube. It’s really how people like cry.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, and it was one of those things like especially starting with Ned Stark’s death like you had said like you brought these books so long ago. Not long ago 90s wasn’t that long ago right, but because he wrote them so long ago that now that people had been getting into it through the series. They’ve been watching like what, you’ve killed off this character. And so you know he is like I wrote that so long ago. And he got like I think stuff that that he upset, fans were upset back then. But now it’s like this whole resurgence of people who are like what?

 

Lauren Martino: What did you do this for?

 

Susan Moritz: Exactly, exactly.

 

David Payne:  So we determine that a lot of people are dying.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

David Payne:  And a show that has a reputation for gratuitous violence, is that reputation merited do you think? What makes it essential for the story it’s telling?

 

Susan Moritz:  I sort of think it feels like it feels essential in the sense that and I'm not a fan of torture and other things that have happened. But if the characters that either do it or they do it themselves or either the actors or that they are the ones that order something to be done you just hate them and despise them so much that you’re just compelled that justice must be served. And something horrible must happen to these people and that’s how I feel about and there is like you know.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I want to just say about it and I wanted to bring up the fact that good people also get torture.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Angelica Regifo:  And good people get killed. The good ones die, the bad ones die and you’re sad. But then you’re happy because the bad ones die. And one of the best things ever is when Joffrey died.

 

Lauren Martino:  Jeffrey?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Joffrey

 

Susan Moritz: And Ramsay Bolton? Oh, those I feel like the two are like the worst people. Although Petyr Baelish also but.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Oh, yes, Baelish was also gratifying to see him die.

 

David Payne:  So it’s like a whole cast of characters.

 

Susan Moritz:  And I think that’s why this season, the last season has been just so gratifying is that finally the tables you feel have turned and we’re like finding the characters you love or getting some justice and getting some vengeance. It has been like oh ­–.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  The Starks are back together.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And the pack is to together and pack together.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  They’re going to survive, hopefully all of them.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, definitely.  The lone wolf dies, but the pack survives when winter comes.

 

Lauren Martino:  So if you have seen all the TV shows, and you have read all of the books and there you’ve got so much free time on your hands now that you're all done with everything and waiting for the next season or waiting for the next book, what do you suggest like is there anything that's also good along the same lines that can fill the void in your life until the next thing comes out?

 

Susan Moritz:  No.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yet I will say watch them again, rate them again, read other George R. R. Martin books. Because he writes in such a way that I haven't seen somebody else write. He is so much. I mean, I'm into a lot of detail so I’d like that about him and I like his books because of it. So I will say read the books again, watch the TV show again.

 

Susan Moritz:  And like you get those from the libraries and I love when the library started to get the TV shows in the catalog and yeah, I can finally binge watch all these shows that I want to watch. But some good ones, I would suggest that we have in our collection that people can like place holds on and check out on The Borgias that was really good. I like that TV series. The Tudors, I mean that sort of gets that sort of medieval kind of element. Supernatural.

 

I’ve mean to watch Empire that's very like backstabbing like who's on top you know, kind of thing power grabbing. I’m trying to think what and there are some other things. And one of the Philippa Gregory writes a lot of you know historical fiction, the Shakespeare plays, Shakespeare movies and there was something as oh, but I love that Angelica mentioned that some people might not know that he has written these sort of like little short prequel novellas, George R. R. Martin.

 

Lauren Martino:  Oh!

 

Susan Moritz:  So you can get like sort of these little like sort of prequel stories. And he has them hidden in these super thick short story compilations. So you can and I’ve definitely I’ve checked them out of the librar before. And so yes you can get those. Other things I think we’ve got like the Wit of Tyrion Lannister, Wit and Wisdom of Tyrion Lannister. So we’ve got these all other, these other Game of Thrones books that if you’ve read the books, but we got these other companion kind of books that are cool too.

 

David Payne:  So there is life after Game of Thrones.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, yes, yes, we hope so. I have one more season and then we hope there is.

 

David Payne:  On MCPL we’re happy to find those resources for you. Well, Susan and Angelica thank you both very much indeed.

 

Julie Dina:  And now a brief message about MCPL services and resources.

 

Febe Huezo:  Looking for your next favorite book, MCPL can help. Fill out or what do I check out next online form and tell us what you like to read. You can find the link to the service on our homepage. We will email you a list of three to five books that our librarians have chosen just for you. Happy reading.

 

Julie Dina:  Hi, I'm Julie Dina, one of the new hosts for Library Matters. And here with me is Anita Vassallo, our new Acting Director. Anita couldn't make the main recording for our Game of Thrones episode, but knowing that she is such a great fan we are making this special segment just to have her here on this show. So here we are. Welcome Anita and thanks for being here with us.

 

Anita Vassallo:  Thank you Julie. I am a big Game of Thrones fans so I'm really excited that I was invited to be here with this little extra piece for the Game of Thrones podcast.

 

Julie Dina:  So why don’t you just tell us, what is compelling about Game of Thrones?

 

Anita Vassallo:  So I think for both the books and the TV show in the past seasons the most compelling part is the intricacy of the plot and the slow and careful development of all of the characters. You currently dive way into this world then the people had inhabited. And then of course there is the anyone can die at any time philosophy. So Game of Thrones is famous for chopping the heads off of major characters in a most unexpected fashion and just moving on from there.

 

So although I really love the TV show and have watched every single episodes since the day it premiered I do miss now the pacing from the first seasons like maybe the first four or five seasons where it was very careful of how they were developing everything. And now because we just finished the second to last season and there are only six episodes left everything has really speeded up and sometimes you're wondering how did they get from there to that, but you just have to kind of forget about that part.

 

Julie Dina:  You mentioned something about characters. So what particular character would you say your most like?

 

Anita Vassallo:  Well, I'm not sure I’m really most like any of them, but the one I admired the most is Lady Olenna Tyrell. And since you haven’t watched this show you don’t know who she is.

 

Julie Dina:  I don’t.

 

Anita Vassallo:  But she is the matriarch of the Tyrell family who lives at Highgarden that's their seat so she is my idol. She is very funny and sarcastic. She is kind of like the grandmother in Downton Abbey. So she can toss off these quips and cut people down to size. And this past season she was basically executed, but she was still throwing off the quips right before her death. And after she drank poison that was given to her by Jaime Lannister she still managed to twist the knife into him one more time. So she is great, great gosh.

 

Julie Dina:  Well, since you talk so much about her, if you could invite one particular character to a dinner or if you can invite them and take them somewhere who amongst all these characters that you love would you be?

 

Anita Vassallo:  Well, I did think about this because I knew this was a question and it comes up to a choice between Tyrion Lannister and Tyrion would be great to take out because he would have a lot to say about all of the behind-the-scenes double-dealing and his crazy family. And he would also probably be a lot of fun because he likes to drink and have a good time. So for Tyrion we’d have to go out to a really nice wine bar because he loves his wine. But the other person that I think will be really interesting to take would be Maester Aemon. And Maester Aemon is the 100-year-old blind Maester of the Night's Watch. Look at Julie looking at me. But in reality he was a Targaryen prince. He was the son or the uncle of I think of the Mad King, Aerys if I have that right. And if I don't have it right we’ll find out about it in half minute. So he refused the crown and he has been with the Night's Watch for many, many years and think of all the stories that he could tell.

 

Julie Dina:  So Anita I can see the glow in your eyes when you talk about all these different characters and you’re talking about this show. Can you tell me one most surprising thing about Game of Thrones?

 

Anita Vassallo:  Yes, so I think the most surprising thing about Game of Thrones both George R.R. Martin books and the television show is how people who really don't love fantasy and have probably never read a fantasy book or so enthralled with it now even if they came to through in TV show they go back and read the books or they listen to the books on audio so they don’t really know anything about fantasy. They don't know about Lord of the Rings or the Narnia books, but they just love this and they get so obsessed and maybe it's the sex and violence.

 

Julie Dina:  It could be, it could be that gets a lot of people. So I do know that you’re a great fan of horses and you do own a couple of them.

 

Anita Vassallo:  Yes, we have horses at home so you know if you’re a fan I guess that's one way of putting it. But I know that horses are really important in Game of Thrones because the nearest Targaryen of course is the Khaleesi of the Dothraki. Look at Julie’s face.

 

Julie Dina:  Yes, and all these things.

 

Anita Vassallo:  And they are basically the horse lords, the lords of the grass, the sea. So horses are extremely important in their culture. Their main God is the Great Stallion and when the nearest Targaryen becomes pregnant of course she has to eat a Stallion's heart and that's a very graphic scene shown on this show. So yeah, I mean and it’s fun to watch all the beautiful horses and the second to last or third to last episode this season was a great battle scene with all these horse warriors attacking some infantry and they came roaring in on their horses and they stood up on their backs with their bows and arrows and it was really cool.

 

Julie Dina:  Well, I’ve got to say thank you so much Anita for joining us for this segment. Let’s keep this conversation going by following us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcast from. Also, please review and rate us on iTunes. We love to know what you're thinking. Once again, I want to thank all our listeners for joining on to this conversation today and see you next time.

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