Info

Library Matters

Library Matters is a podcast by Montgomery County Public Libraries exploring the world of books, libraries, technology, and learning.
RSS Feed
2017
October
September
August
July
June
May
March
February


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2017

Library Matters is a podcast of Montgomery County Public Libraries (MCPL) in Montgomery County, MD. Each episode we explore the world of books, libraries, technology, and learning. Library Matters is hosted by Alessandro Russo, Senior Librarian at MCPL's Rockville Memorial branch, and David Watts, Circulation Supervisor at the Silver Spring branch

Oct 13, 2017

Recording Date: September 29, 2017

Episode Summary: We talk with MCPL's Workforce and Business Development Program Specialist Adrienne Van Lare about how MCPL can help you find a job or advance your career. MCPL's Workforce Development program just won an Honorable Mention Award from the Urban Libraries Council Innovations Initiative. 

Guest: Adrienne Van Lare

Books Mentioned During this Episode:

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: A young woman immigrates from Nigeria to America, but finds her new life is not what she expected.   

Quiet: the Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain: How society's bias toward extroversion undervalues and masks the value of those who prefer listening to speaking and reading to partying. 

MCPL Resources Mentioned During this Episode

Career Events at MCPL: An up to date list of upcoming career event at MCPL branches.

Career Online High School: Online program for earning an accredited high school diploma and career certificate. 

Gale Courses: Free online courses and career training. Covers a variety of topics including accounting, computers applications, healthcare, legal, personal development, teaching, and writing. 

MCPL's Jobs / Careers Guide: MCPL's jobs & careers website includes links to job search sites, training databases, online college and professional test prep material, career events at MCPL branches, resume and cover letter writing aids, and more. 

Other Resources Mentioned During this Episode:

Maryland Workforce Exchange: The state of Maryland's website for residents looking for jobs, employers looking for workers, and students and researchers looking for state labor market information.

Upwardly Global: A nonprofit organization that helps immigrants rebuild their careers and find jobs in their professional fields. 

USA Jobs: The US Federal Government's official job search site.  

Worksource Montgomery: A Montgomery County nonprofit whose mission is to meet the needs of strategic industries to attract workers and the needs of the underemployed and unemployed to find career paths with sustainable wages. 

Oct 10, 2017

Listen to the audio.

Adrienne Miles Holderbaum (producer):  Welcome to Library Matters, the Montgomery County Public Libraries’ podcast.

 

Julie Dina:  Welcome to Montgomery County Public Libraries’ Library Matters podcast. I’m Julie Dina, one of the new hosts along with Lauren Martino and David Payne. In this episode, Lauren and David enjoy a lively discussion about Game of Thrones with two staff members who are fans of the books and show. We have a bonus feature at the end. A brief talk with Acting Director, Anita Vassallo, another Game of Thrones fan who couldn't make the main recording, but didn't want to be left out of the fun.

 

David Payne:  Welcome to Library Matters with your host Lauren Martino.

 

Lauren Martino:  Hello.

 

David Payne:  And myself David Payne. Today we’ll be talking about a fantasy epic that has become a cultural phenomenon since it first appeared in print over two decades ago taking place in settings where magic joints and dragons exist. You may be forgiven for thinking we are referring to Harry Potter. It is in fact Game of Thrones that we will be discussing a world that began with the publication of George Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series in the mid 1990s and has continued with his subsequent adaptation into a fantasy drama series on television, which has attracted record viewing figures all over the world.

 

Here to tell us all about the intriguing world of Game of Thrones, I'm very pleased to welcome two MCPL staff members who come to claused as Game of Thrones devotees Susan Moritz and Angelica Rengifo. Before we go any further however, as we delve deeply into the Game of Thrones world, please note there will be spoilers in this conversation. If you're not up-to-date on Game of Thrones and wish to avoid spoilers, do come back to us after you’ve caught up to the most recent Game of Thrones episodes. So welcome Susan and Angelica.

 

Susan Moritz:  Hello.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Hello, thank you.

 

Lauren Martino:  So David and I have never seen any Game of Thrones shows or read any of the books. So how would you describe this world and why should we be interested?

 

Susan Moritz: Well, it’s sort of hard to – it’s so such a vast and exciting world that’s hard to break it down into one little – [Multiple Speakers].

 

Lauren Martino:  Come on in 30 seconds.

 

Susan Moritz:  In 30 seconds what can I say? So I guess I want to say that it was that it’s like a medieval fantasy and its set in the fictional land of Westeros and there are seven kingdoms that are ruled by one king, exactly.

 

Lauren Martino:  One king to rule them all.

 

Susan Moritz:  One king to rule them all, exactly, exactly very much like Lord of the Rings-esc. And it’s sort of what happens when the king is accidently killed during a boar hunting accident, but he is really murdered of course.

 

Lauren Martino:  Freak boar hunting accident.

 

Susan Moritz:  Freak boar hunting accident, exactly, exactly. How would that have ever happened? You know, so of course, it sends this fragile piece that sort of kept these seven sort of separate kingdoms together basically falls apart. And vast chaos and everyone decides that they want to be king and who wants to sit in the iron throne, do you think that’s right Angelica, are there other things that I missed?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I’ll say that definitely it looks very medieval.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  It’s fantasy. We have dragons, we have magic, we have dead people that come back to life.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, White Walkers exactly.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, and also like for example the Dondarrion that is brought back to life by Thoros of Myr. We also have a lot of sex, a lot of backstabbing, we had a politics and a lot of complicatid family ties.

 

David Payne:  Sounds like you’re ever things is there.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Lauren Martino: Downton Abbey?

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, I think it was funny like I watching the show until like the very last I think it was the very last episode or the second to last episode of the season I sort of didn't realize it had this sort of fantasy element to it. And it just sort of looked I mean, even though it was set in a fictional fantasy world it sort of just looked very medieval, very King Arthur-esc kind of time period.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And the big bull have happened.

 

Susan Moritz:  But then these dragons get hatched.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes,

 

Susan Moritz: And there was like wait, there is dragons here. So then I was like, wait, I think this is a little bit more even more fantasy, magic kind of stuff that I was thinking it would be as.

 

David Payne:  So do you think one has to have a sense of or appreciation of history to enjoy the series or does it not matter?

 

Susan Moritz:  I don’t think it matters, I mean, I –.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, we can say – I can say from personal experience I have never been into fantasy. I have never been into Harry Potter or anything like that until I started watching and reading A Song of Ice and Fire.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, this is perfect because I have been a fan of you know historically fiction and history and fantasy like Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter. So I think this is great. It shows that you can like and no matter you feel like this if your thing or not.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I’m definitely into history and I love my favorite movies have like Trilogy have been the Lord of the Rings, but I’d never like Harry Potter. And this show, even the TV show, it's really great and the production is so great.

 

Lauren Martino:  Why do you think it has attracted such a wide fan base? What makes it appealing to fans of so many different completely different people that all like the same thing?

 

Susan Moritz:  I would say that sort of my two criteria for any like great TV show or movie or books is it’s got to have a good plot and it has a great plot. It has these twists and these turns and I remember even after that I was hooked by the very first episode, some marginal TV show that takes you while to get into, but I was like this whole like plot twist at the end where you find out that the Queen is sleeping with her twin brother.

 

Lauren Martino:  What?

 

Susan Moritz:  And yes, exactly, exactly. And where the beloved Starks because I love the Stark family, you know, accidently one of the kids sees them and it’s like and her brothers like “the things I do for love” and pushes him out of the tower you think to his death. He winds up surviving, but you’re like, but it ends with him like falling out of the tower and you’re like, oh, my god, what’s going to happen next. So I think it’s got a great plot with these surprising twists and it just has great characters like you really like with the Starks you really love them.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Susan Moritz:  You’re just so invested what is going to happen and what’s going to happen next. Are they going to get justice? Are they going to get back together, they’re going as a unit as a family unit. And the other thing is there is characters that you hate so badly that you hope that something horrible, horrible, horrible happens to them.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, you hope that something horrible happen to them. And the one of the thing that I have to say about the characters too is just because you sometimes think you know them like there is definitely characters I love and characters I hate. But there is ones that you feel like that change like Jamie Lannister, I think we had talked about that about how starts off he is the one the brother of the Queen who pushes his kid. You think this is the most horrible guy ever. He is sleeping with his twin sister. He has pushed this little boy.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And he is full of himself. He is – he thinks he is entitled to everything, and he doesn’t care. He has no care for anybody besides his sister not even his father I mean, he is afraid of his father in some way or another. But I want to bring up the point that you said that you got hooked on the first episode of the show. I didn't.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, you didn’t?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, how funny. How funny. I was totally hooked of that first episode.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, it took me a while. I tried to watch the first episode three times and I couldn't get pass I don’t know it was too much.

 

David Payne:  So what make you go back?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Just the fact that it was history and everybody was talking about it. And like yeah, it has a history and then I got into the books and also I didn’t know it like it was always present in my mind that I have to watch this, I have to watch this. And that’s what I tell everybody because that's what I experience when I get friends to like try to watch it I tell them, don't give up on the first and second episodes.

 

Lauren Martino:  And that’s hard you have to stick with it.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes, push through because like that’s what happened to me. I had to push through and like actually sit down and say, I'm going to finish this first episode. I’m going to finish this second episode.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, there is definitely payoffs. There is definitely payoffs for sticking with the series like, these are like the characters like change like with Jamie like you hate him in the very beginning. The Queen’s brother like he is this horrible guy. And then he like he himself suffers a tragedy he is like in order to help out Brienne I mean his swordhand gets cut off. And he basically has to relearn how to like so of course this is very important, but you know, he totally got to be good and he has got these good qualities. And you've just totally in the first episode of written him off as this horrible murderer, that’s a horrible guy.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Because he has to learn to be him without being a fighter. That was his personality and his worth was that he was able – he was the best sword man in the kingdom. And when that his hand gets cut off he cannot put value on himself and does what he like almost dies when he was being brought to the, what was it?, back to south, yeah.

 

David Payne:  So, you talked about the TV series. How would you compare it to the books I mean, having read the books and seen the show, which one do you, do you both prefer?

 

Susan Moritz:  I like both, would you say that you like both too?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I like both because I like the books because he goes, George R. R. Martin, goes into so much detail describing the landscape, describing people, describing the thoughts of the characters. And also I like the show because you can put a face to the characters that you have been reading about. And the other thing is that like after season five they go on a different like a different direction than the books do.

 

Lauren Martino:  Really so they diverge.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes. And there are a lot of plots like side plots that do not get the attention or not even mention on the TV show that you find on the books. Like for example, the Dorn plot with the sand, snakes, and the daughter of the King of Dorn it's a really great plot in the books. And on the TV show it’s a side plot is a – we are losing time watching this because it doesn't go anywhere.

 

Susan Moritz:  I would totally agree with that and that’s exact same thing I was thinking about like there is this Kingdom of Dorn, one of the kingdoms. And then in the TV show it was like, oh, we’re going to include it and then it was like oh, no, wait, we've got so much, so much we got to go.

 

Lauren Martino:  Back up.

 

Susan Moritz:  We’ve got a range that. And exactly pack up exactly, exactly. And I like the way that I started with it too like I watched the first season. So they’re having – and then I read the books and I read all the way through. And so I was thinking that you know, it's like I already have these images in my head, this is this character, this is this. And you already had that sort of intro to it so you’re not like overwhelmed by detail or stuff with the books like who is this and what’s this again and you’re already sort of ready to jump on. But now since George R. R. Martin is not writing fast enough the show has gone past the books. So basically the show is now all we have now that you’re going to write all the books like that’s – that’s all you got left now.

 

David Payne:  Has it become too complicated?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, I like it. So like even the reading and the books are great, yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, I don’t think it’s become too complicated, but I think it’s probably become too complicated for George R. R. Martin to write.

 

Lauren Martino: And one person is not enough anymore

 

Susan Moritz: Definitely, and it was like with his thing apparently he doesn’t, unlike I think JK Rowling, does not outline anything. So he just like, so his got it like 1000 page books. And so he just sort of like has this huge world with all these characters and it’s like then he used to write, write, write.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And he writes chapters. So each chapter is a character and it’s the point of view of the character. But I’ve heard I don't know if it's true that he has hired someone to get whatever he see his mind in draft.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, my goodness. I love that.

 

David Payne:  Well, I have to ask Game of Thrones was described to me as "Shakespeare's history plays with dragons”. Now I don’t know how familiar you are with Shakespeare’s history plays, but any thoughts on the comparison?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I do not agree with that.

 

Susan Moritz:  You don’t.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I don’t.

 

Susan Moritz:  I would totally say that I would agree. Yeah, do you want to do the con and then I’ll do the pro.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  So I don't agree with that even though Shakespeare has written about Richard III and The Wars of the Roses it's still a play. He doesn't develop something new. He doesn't develop the characters. We don't know the depth of the characters. So I feel like he is about comparison and he is not fair to George R. R. Martin, because again we can go back to the fact that two of the plays by Shakespeare are based on kings that went through or where became kings after The Wars of the Roses. And A Song of Ice and Fire is based on The Wars of the Roses. And so, but it has more depth. You can definitely take sides.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, definitely.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  You cannot do that on a play. So I feel like no, I do not agree with that. I think that’s great.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, I didn't realize about The Wars of the Roses that does bring an interesting element into it. And I guess what I thinking of that Shakespeare like history of plays I was thinking of sort of the characters and sort of like sort of similarities kind of thing. And I was thinking in Henry V like one of my – one of the great lines as I and I’m pretty sure hope everything and hope I’ve got all my Shakespeare all coordinated my brain. But uneasy lies the head that wears the crown. And I feel about –.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  You think.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, yes and then in this show it has been uneasy for every single person even the king who was the King Robert Baratheon you know when the show starts the kings before them that his king –.

 

Lauren Martino:  Before the freak boar hunting accident.

 

Susan Moritz:  Before yeah, yeah, when there was the mad king before him that was burning people a lot. No, I mean, it’s been since then and anybody else who has come in it’s been very uneasy.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Very dead.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes and so I see, yes. So I see that I definitely see that. I also see with sort of Henry V that sort of like band of brothers, everybody together, I sort of see that and sort of in Jon Snow and Dany sort of the inspiration the people who follow them they're just so inspired by them and they’re really dedicated to sort of how Henry V was with that. I just see different things with different ones. On Henry IV, you know, overtook the throne from I think it was Richard II and about how like, it was the whole like divine right of kings, and this is this and even in this.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  But in plays that you don’t get developed.

 

Susan Moritz:  Well, that’s true.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  That’s what I feel, but it’s not similar. They’re not similar because the characters do not get developed. You don't feel like they have personality. Everything that we know about the characters in Shakespeare plays is what we know from history. What we have read in other things, not from Shakespeare himself.

 

Susan Moritz:   There is only so much room to expand to change what’s there.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Whereas George R. R. Martin has been whatever he wants to do.

 

Lauren Martino:  Yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Right, yeah they definitely doesn’t have the depth I would say you’re writing the characters and then with Shakespeare he was probably writing for Queen Elizabeth II. I want to make sure that everybody sort of hey, that’s her that came out looking pretty good and Richard III of course was not going to look good at all. Although, I hear conflicting reports about that how he was in the real life there so.

 

David Payne:  It sounds like you both know your Shakespeare.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, well that’s good, yes.

 

David Payne:  So a quick aside for initiated like Lauren and myself. What is the thought of Game of Thrones, what does that allude to?

 

Susan Moritz:  I think it’s the Game of Thrones. I just think of the line that Cersei Lannister whose the Queen says to Ned Stark it’s like “when you play the Game of Thrones, you either win or you die.” So basically when you're trying to gain the throne you either going to win and you’re going to get on that, you’re going to get to on the iron throne. They got this iron throne with that’s basically melted of swords right from I think the people who they call bend the knee, you’re pledging your oath to you know your allegiance to this person. So they’ve got this like iron throne that you sit on which obviously looks very uncomfortable.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  It was on parks and rec.

 

Susan Moritz:  Oh, well, why is this, that’s right, that’s right.

 

Lauren Martino:  She gave Ben his own Iron Throne. It was this big, that was the best present he ever got in the whole world that is also I’ve tried.

 

Susan Moritz:  No, no, no and that’s I totally forgot about that and you totally reminded me of about I think I heard that the Queen, the current Queen actually got to visit the set and of course they were like oh, do you want to go sit on. And she is like oh, no, no. And I was like smart lady, I can do imagine –.

 

Lauren Martino:  Don’t allow yourself with that.

 

Susan Moritz:  Exactly, exactly.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And also now that you bring up the throne prequels books that came before song of Ice and Fire there is a King, a Targaryen, that used to sit on the throne and he will get cut because again it’s made of real swords. It’s not just like not swords that are not going to cut your or whatever.

 

Susan Moritz:  So it’s uneasy the bum that sits on the iron throne, not just head with the crown there so.

 

Lauren Martino:  Exactly. So now, you’ve peaked my interest MCPL has all of these items I can go back to my branch and I can either order the season one or I can order the audio book or I can order the print book

 

Angelica Rengifo: or download the audiobook.

 

Lauren Martino:  Or download the electronic audiobook. So which would you recommend, what should I go do?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Oh, I prefer you to read.

 

Lauren Martino:  To read the actual book.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes.

 

Lauren Martino:  Do the book and not the TV show and not the audio book.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yeah, I’ll prefer the story maybe for someone who does not have an idea of it like Susan said, watch the show so you know who are the characters and you have an idea of who is who and where they are and where they come from and you can put a face when you.

 

Lauren Martino:  Quick introduction.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yeah.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, and I think it’s great too if you’re not too much into like the sex and the violence and stuff. Having watched the first season and then read through all the books I was prepared for like seasons two through I guess five about anything bad that was coming up. So I sort of knew I was like okay, I’m going to go this scene is coming up in the show. I’m going to go to the kitchen. I’m going back and I’ll be little back right here. So that to me was very helpful knowing it was coming down the pike there. One of the funniest things I think about it is like there is a huge character death. I mean, when you first see it, you’re just like oh, Ned Stark. He is this Sean Bean because I love Lord of the Rings and Sean Bean was in there.

 

Lauren Martino:  Oh Sean Bean.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Lauren Martino:  Sean Bean dies?

 

Angelica Regifo:  Yes and like in every movie.

 

Lauren Martino:  Yes, I know, I know.

 

Susan Moritz:  Because it was like the second to last episodes of season one. And I was like oh, no, at the last minute no, no, no.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  So and then this is the third season, second season when Catelyn Stark dies and Robb Stark and you’re like.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, The Big Red Wedding. And what I loved about that was like so I knew it was coming.

 

Lauren Martino:  The Big Red Wedding.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  No, it’s The Red Wedding.

 

Lauren Martino:  Because everyone dies?

 

Susan Martino: Two of the main characters you love die. And you think they're all okay, because there is just the guest rights. You come in. You’ve eaten from, if I’ve come to your home and you fed me some food that I'm okay, but it didn't and they turned on them and went up killing them. And if you need a laugh they have YouTube videos of people who knew what was coming and videotape the people around them who are watching.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yes, I’ve watched those on YouTube. It’s really how people like cry.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah, and it was one of those things like especially starting with Ned Stark’s death like you had said like you brought these books so long ago. Not long ago 90s wasn’t that long ago right, but because he wrote them so long ago that now that people had been getting into it through the series. They’ve been watching like what, you’ve killed off this character. And so you know he is like I wrote that so long ago. And he got like I think stuff that that he upset, fans were upset back then. But now it’s like this whole resurgence of people who are like what?

 

Lauren Martino: What did you do this for?

 

Susan Moritz: Exactly, exactly.

 

David Payne:  So we determine that a lot of people are dying.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

David Payne:  And a show that has a reputation for gratuitous violence, is that reputation merited do you think? What makes it essential for the story it’s telling?

 

Susan Moritz:  I sort of think it feels like it feels essential in the sense that and I'm not a fan of torture and other things that have happened. But if the characters that either do it or they do it themselves or either the actors or that they are the ones that order something to be done you just hate them and despise them so much that you’re just compelled that justice must be served. And something horrible must happen to these people and that’s how I feel about and there is like you know.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  I want to just say about it and I wanted to bring up the fact that good people also get torture.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Angelica Regifo:  And good people get killed. The good ones die, the bad ones die and you’re sad. But then you’re happy because the bad ones die. And one of the best things ever is when Joffrey died.

 

Lauren Martino:  Jeffrey?

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Joffrey

 

Susan Moritz: And Ramsay Bolton? Oh, those I feel like the two are like the worst people. Although Petyr Baelish also but.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Oh, yes, Baelish was also gratifying to see him die.

 

David Payne:  So it’s like a whole cast of characters.

 

Susan Moritz:  And I think that’s why this season, the last season has been just so gratifying is that finally the tables you feel have turned and we’re like finding the characters you love or getting some justice and getting some vengeance. It has been like oh ­–.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  The Starks are back together.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  And the pack is to together and pack together.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yeah.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  They’re going to survive, hopefully all of them.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, definitely.  The lone wolf dies, but the pack survives when winter comes.

 

Lauren Martino:  So if you have seen all the TV shows, and you have read all of the books and there you’ve got so much free time on your hands now that you're all done with everything and waiting for the next season or waiting for the next book, what do you suggest like is there anything that's also good along the same lines that can fill the void in your life until the next thing comes out?

 

Susan Moritz:  No.

 

Angelica Rengifo:  Yet I will say watch them again, rate them again, read other George R. R. Martin books. Because he writes in such a way that I haven't seen somebody else write. He is so much. I mean, I'm into a lot of detail so I’d like that about him and I like his books because of it. So I will say read the books again, watch the TV show again.

 

Susan Moritz:  And like you get those from the libraries and I love when the library started to get the TV shows in the catalog and yeah, I can finally binge watch all these shows that I want to watch. But some good ones, I would suggest that we have in our collection that people can like place holds on and check out on The Borgias that was really good. I like that TV series. The Tudors, I mean that sort of gets that sort of medieval kind of element. Supernatural.

 

I’ve mean to watch Empire that's very like backstabbing like who's on top you know, kind of thing power grabbing. I’m trying to think what and there are some other things. And one of the Philippa Gregory writes a lot of you know historical fiction, the Shakespeare plays, Shakespeare movies and there was something as oh, but I love that Angelica mentioned that some people might not know that he has written these sort of like little short prequel novellas, George R. R. Martin.

 

Lauren Martino:  Oh!

 

Susan Moritz:  So you can get like sort of these little like sort of prequel stories. And he has them hidden in these super thick short story compilations. So you can and I’ve definitely I’ve checked them out of the librar before. And so yes you can get those. Other things I think we’ve got like the Wit of Tyrion Lannister, Wit and Wisdom of Tyrion Lannister. So we’ve got these all other, these other Game of Thrones books that if you’ve read the books, but we got these other companion kind of books that are cool too.

 

David Payne:  So there is life after Game of Thrones.

 

Susan Moritz:  Yes, yes, yes, we hope so. I have one more season and then we hope there is.

 

David Payne:  On MCPL we’re happy to find those resources for you. Well, Susan and Angelica thank you both very much indeed.

 

Julie Dina:  And now a brief message about MCPL services and resources.

 

Febe Huezo:  Looking for your next favorite book, MCPL can help. Fill out or what do I check out next online form and tell us what you like to read. You can find the link to the service on our homepage. We will email you a list of three to five books that our librarians have chosen just for you. Happy reading.

 

Julie Dina:  Hi, I'm Julie Dina, one of the new hosts for Library Matters. And here with me is Anita Vassallo, our new Acting Director. Anita couldn't make the main recording for our Game of Thrones episode, but knowing that she is such a great fan we are making this special segment just to have her here on this show. So here we are. Welcome Anita and thanks for being here with us.

 

Anita Vassallo:  Thank you Julie. I am a big Game of Thrones fans so I'm really excited that I was invited to be here with this little extra piece for the Game of Thrones podcast.

 

Julie Dina:  So why don’t you just tell us, what is compelling about Game of Thrones?

 

Anita Vassallo:  So I think for both the books and the TV show in the past seasons the most compelling part is the intricacy of the plot and the slow and careful development of all of the characters. You currently dive way into this world then the people had inhabited. And then of course there is the anyone can die at any time philosophy. So Game of Thrones is famous for chopping the heads off of major characters in a most unexpected fashion and just moving on from there.

 

So although I really love the TV show and have watched every single episodes since the day it premiered I do miss now the pacing from the first seasons like maybe the first four or five seasons where it was very careful of how they were developing everything. And now because we just finished the second to last season and there are only six episodes left everything has really speeded up and sometimes you're wondering how did they get from there to that, but you just have to kind of forget about that part.

 

Julie Dina:  You mentioned something about characters. So what particular character would you say your most like?

 

Anita Vassallo:  Well, I'm not sure I’m really most like any of them, but the one I admired the most is Lady Olenna Tyrell. And since you haven’t watched this show you don’t know who she is.

 

Julie Dina:  I don’t.

 

Anita Vassallo:  But she is the matriarch of the Tyrell family who lives at Highgarden that's their seat so she is my idol. She is very funny and sarcastic. She is kind of like the grandmother in Downton Abbey. So she can toss off these quips and cut people down to size. And this past season she was basically executed, but she was still throwing off the quips right before her death. And after she drank poison that was given to her by Jaime Lannister she still managed to twist the knife into him one more time. So she is great, great gosh.

 

Julie Dina:  Well, since you talk so much about her, if you could invite one particular character to a dinner or if you can invite them and take them somewhere who amongst all these characters that you love would you be?

 

Anita Vassallo:  Well, I did think about this because I knew this was a question and it comes up to a choice between Tyrion Lannister and Tyrion would be great to take out because he would have a lot to say about all of the behind-the-scenes double-dealing and his crazy family. And he would also probably be a lot of fun because he likes to drink and have a good time. So for Tyrion we’d have to go out to a really nice wine bar because he loves his wine. But the other person that I think will be really interesting to take would be Maester Aemon. And Maester Aemon is the 100-year-old blind Maester of the Night's Watch. Look at Julie looking at me. But in reality he was a Targaryen prince. He was the son or the uncle of I think of the Mad King, Aerys if I have that right. And if I don't have it right we’ll find out about it in half minute. So he refused the crown and he has been with the Night's Watch for many, many years and think of all the stories that he could tell.

 

Julie Dina:  So Anita I can see the glow in your eyes when you talk about all these different characters and you’re talking about this show. Can you tell me one most surprising thing about Game of Thrones?

 

Anita Vassallo:  Yes, so I think the most surprising thing about Game of Thrones both George R.R. Martin books and the television show is how people who really don't love fantasy and have probably never read a fantasy book or so enthralled with it now even if they came to through in TV show they go back and read the books or they listen to the books on audio so they don’t really know anything about fantasy. They don't know about Lord of the Rings or the Narnia books, but they just love this and they get so obsessed and maybe it's the sex and violence.

 

Julie Dina:  It could be, it could be that gets a lot of people. So I do know that you’re a great fan of horses and you do own a couple of them.

 

Anita Vassallo:  Yes, we have horses at home so you know if you’re a fan I guess that's one way of putting it. But I know that horses are really important in Game of Thrones because the nearest Targaryen of course is the Khaleesi of the Dothraki. Look at Julie’s face.

 

Julie Dina:  Yes, and all these things.

 

Anita Vassallo:  And they are basically the horse lords, the lords of the grass, the sea. So horses are extremely important in their culture. Their main God is the Great Stallion and when the nearest Targaryen becomes pregnant of course she has to eat a Stallion's heart and that's a very graphic scene shown on this show. So yeah, I mean and it’s fun to watch all the beautiful horses and the second to last or third to last episode this season was a great battle scene with all these horse warriors attacking some infantry and they came roaring in on their horses and they stood up on their backs with their bows and arrows and it was really cool.

 

Julie Dina:  Well, I’ve got to say thank you so much Anita for joining us for this segment. Let’s keep this conversation going by following us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest. Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcast from. Also, please review and rate us on iTunes. We love to know what you're thinking. Once again, I want to thank all our listeners for joining on to this conversation today and see you next time.

Sep 29, 2017

Spoilers Are Coming! This episode has more Game of Throne book and television series spoilers than you can shake a sword at. 

Recording Date: September 20, 2017

Episode Summary: Winter is coming. At least that's what the Game of Thrones fans among our staff say. We invited a few such fans onto the podcast to share their enthusiasm for the immensely popular Game of Thrones books and television series.  

Note: Library Matters has new hosts! You'll hear 2 of our new hosts, Davis Library Branch Manager David Payne and Silver Spring Librarian Lauren Martino during the main part of the episode. Our third host, Outreach Associate Julie Dina, introduces this episode and returns at the end to talk with our Acting Director, Anita Vassallo, who couldn't make the main recording session, but is a big Game of Thrones fan and didn't want to miss out on the fun.  

Guests:
Susan Moritz, Digital Strategies Program Manager
Angelica Rengifo, Outreach Associate
Anita Vassallo, Acting Director, MCPL

Notable Quotes:

"Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown." Henry IV, Part II, William Shakespeare

"Uneasy lies the bum that sits on the (Iron) Throne." Susan Moritz

"When you play the game of thrones, you win or you die." Game of Thrones, Season 1, Episode 7, Cersei Lannister 

Game of Thrones Books and Media Mentioned During This Episode:

Game of Thrones (television series): A dramatic, often violent cable television saga of the conflicts, alliances, and intrigue among noble families vying for control of or independence from the high kingship that rules over the 7 kingdoms. 

George R.R. Martin: Have you finished the Song of Ice and Fire book series, but still want more? Try some of the other novels and short story collections George R.R. Martin has written or edited. 

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin: The epic fantasy book series upon which the Game of Thrones television series is based. The series currently consists of the following books - 

Martin's fan eagerly, impatiently, await the next planned books in the series, The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring.    

Other Books and Media Mentioned During this Episode:

The Borgias (television series): A chronicle of the 16th century Borgia family's rise to power in the Roman Catholic Church. 

Henry IV by William Shakespeare: A history play about King Henry IV of England and his struggles against internal unrest and Scottish invaders. 

Henry V by William Shakespeare: A history play about King Henry V of England and his role in the Battle of Agincourt in France. 

Philippa Gregory: The author of British historical fiction novels, many of which are set in the 16th century Tudor period.  

Richard III by William Shakespeare: This history play depicts Richard III's rise to power and his short lived reign as king of England.   

Supernatural (television series): A pair of brothers make their way through the world as monster hunters. 

The Tudors (television series): The early years of King Henry VII's 16th century reign over England. 

Read the transcript.

Sep 12, 2017

Listen to the audio.

Adrienne Miles Holderbaum (producer):  Welcome to Library Matters, the Montgomery County Public Libraries’ podcast.

David Watts:  Hello and welcome to Library Matters.  Today, we’re going to talk about Montgomery County Public Library resources and services for people with disabilities.  From our monthly Talking Book Club at Rockville Memorial Library to the assistive technologies available in each branch, today we’ll discuss it all with Elizabeth Lang, Assistant Facilities and Accessibility Program Manager for MCPL.  Welcome to the podcast, Elizabeth Lang.

Elizabeth Lang:  I’m glad to be here.

David Watts:  Take a moment and tell us a bit about yourself, what’s your background, and how did you become interested in library services for people with disabilities?

Elizabeth Lang:  Well, my background is in social work, as well as in bookstores and libraries.  In my past life, I was a social worker at a domestic violence shelter.  And I found that to be very emotionally difficult and shifted over to working in bookstores.

When I was a manager in retail bookstores for, I want to say, about a decade, I was working in a Barnes & Noble, and saw a position posted for Talking Book & Braille Library.  And I wound up working as a librarian and as the Assistant Director for Public Services at the Talking Book & Braille Library in Missouri for about a decade.

That service provided library materials to people who are blind or visually impaired or who had other print disabilities and couldn’t use standard printed materials from their local public library.  I had never intended to go into the field of library services for people who have disabilities; I just kind of wound up there.  And then moved to DC to take a position as a Branch Manager in 2013.  And I worked for them until I came here last November.  And with DC, I was both the Branch Manager and I managed their Center for Accessibility, which was one department at the Martin Luther King main branch.  And the Center for Accessibility provided library services to patrons who had a wide range of disabilities.

In Missouri, I had been providing library service to people who had print disabilities, but at MLK and the Center for Accessibility was providing library service to any person who had any sort of disability that prevented them from using the standard services and materials available throughout the library.  And I’ve just sort of been here ever since.

David Watts:  Tell us about your new role at MCPL.

Elizabeth Lang:  Okay.  As you said, I am the Assistant Facilities and Accessibility Program Manager.  That’s kind of a mouthful, and what it means is I spend about half of my time working on facilities issues, including our refresh projects where we’re renovating our branches, and then about half of my time is focused on providing services, library services to people who have disabilities.

So far as I know, it’s a unique position.  I have not encountered any other library system or library that has a position that is really focused that uniquely on providing library services to people who have disabilities systemwide.

David Watts:  Can you give us a brief description of the Americans with Disabilities Act, otherwise known as ADA, and how it impacts MCPL specifically?

Elizabeth Lang:  Sure.  The Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush.  The law prohibits discrimination, and guarantees that people who have disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else has in employment, state and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation.

The main part of the ADA that impacts MCPL is called the Title II Regulations.  So those apply to state and local governments, specially.  Title II protects qualified individuals with disabilities from discrimination on the basis of disability in services, programs, and activities that we provide.  It also requires that newly constructed or altered government facilities be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

So that means we have a responsibility to design all of our collections, our services, our programs and our facilities in a way that includes everyone.  So nationally, about 12% of the population has some form of a disability, and, in Montgomery County, that number is roughly about 82,000 people.

So for those 82,000 folks, I would like to believe they all use the library.  They’re the folks we’re concernin ourselves with and that I focus on making sure we’re doing a good job of serving.

David Watts:  What traditional library resources and services does MCPL offer for people who have disabilities?

Elizabeth Lang:  We have a pretty wide range of services and materials.  So we have large print books, which most people have heard of, that can be used by folks who have visual impairments.  We also have books on CD.  We also do have a small selection of Braille Books at some of our libraries.  We have a listing of local resources on our library services for People with Disabilities webpage.  We have a Talking Book Group that meets every month that our Rockville location for people who love audiobooks.  Two of our branches also have an accessibility center with work stations and resources that are dedicated to people who have disabilities.

David Watts:  What are some of the new or innovative resources and services MCPL offers to residents with disabilities?

Elizabeth Lang:  Well, every one of our branches now has an assistive technology workstation.  One of our customers has called it the Cadillac of Assistive Technology workstations.  It has screen reading software that’s called JAWS as well as enlarging software that’s called MAGic.  Both of those are for use by people who have low vision and/or who are blind.  It assists them in using the computer.  So the workstation has a large monitor as well for somebody who has a visual impairment and needs the screen enlarged.  It can get pretty big.  That’s very nice.

It also, that workstation, contains something called the ClearView+ Speech desktop magnifier.  Some people know this piece of equipment by the name CCTV, closed-circuit television is what it had been called in the past.  But the one that we just put in is more than the sort of old-fashioned closed-circuit TV that would just show you an image of what you had laid on a tray.  This when you lay your material on the tray, it can show that image on the screen.  It has a very large screen.  It also offers the option of reading aloud.  So it will take – basically it takes a photograph of the item that you’ve placed on the tray, it will show it to you on the screen and then if you tap the screen, it will start reading the defined text areas that it has located out loud to you.  It cannot be used by somebody who has no usable vision, but for someone who has a visual impairment or is legally blind, it can help them read much more easily than, you know, struggling with just using glasses, particularly for something that has very small print.

David Watts:  What is the Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, what resources and services does it offer that are different from what’s available in MCPL?

Elizabeth Lang:  Good questions.  The Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped is a state resource.  It’s a library for people who have print disabilities.  I was talking about the library where I had worked in Missouri, the Talking Book & Braille Library there, that was Missouri’s Talking Book & Braille Library.  The Maryland State Library is the same thing.  So every state has one.

David Watts:  Right.

Elizabeth Lang:  So the one that serves Maryland is based in Baltimore.  And they are supported by the National Library Service, which is a division of the Library of Congress.  So they provide audio books and audio book players to people who can’t use standard print materials.  They mail it all out through the post office and it’s no charge to the patrons.

So to use that library, people have to be certified as having a disability that prevents them from using print.  So they serve sort of a subset of perhaps the folks that we serve.  But they do serve everybody throughout the state.

We, you know, we’re focused on Montgomery County and we will serve any customer within Montgomery County who is interested.  So some of our patrons are probably the same people who are being served by the library in Baltimore.  They can certainly take advantage of both libraries at the same time.  And there was a little bit of overlap, as I’ve said, we do have some books on CD.  That’s a slightly different format than the Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped provides to their customers.  But they can use both of them.

David Watts:  Tell us what happens of MCPL needs to make a change to be in compliance with ADA requirements but can’t make that change for some reason.

Elizabeth Lang:  Sure.  Well, it does happen occasionally that we will discover that some aspects of our buildings or our services are not in compliance with ADA regulations or requirements.

Sometimes it’s something that I or a staff person will discover and sometimes it’s something that’s brought to our attention by one of our customers.  An example that comes to mind is I think it’s our Long Branch facility has a very steep road just outside.  And the sidewalk there is very steep as well.  And we’ve had the county’s ADA Compliance Office staff out there taking a look to see what can be done when we refresh that branch to bring us into compliance in all areas with ADA requirements.

Well, we can’t recut the road or redesign that sidewalk to the extent that would be required to bring it into line with the slope that is required for someone who’s using a wheelchair.  It’s just a very steep street and sidewalk.

So the ADA does recognize that there are going to be instances like that where we simply can’t.  We cannot cut into somebody else’s property.  If something were going to be prohibitively expensive, if we had to, you know, raise a building and rebuild it completely, but we didn’t have the funding.  Let’s say if the building had been built so long ago that nothing was in compliance, it recognizes that’s probably not possible.

So there’s some wording that it says that if something would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a service program or activity or in an undue financial or administrative burden, then we can’t be bunched to do whatever it is that’s been requested.

David Watts:  How has MCPL incorporated ADA requirements, universal design, and the state of concerns of people with disabilities into the refresh of its branches?  What are some specific examples?

Elizabeth Lang:  The main focus of my position actually is to sort of pay attention to the intersection of all these things.  So that’s a large question.

And I will sort of start with universal design.  The idea behind universal design is that things can be designed to be usable by everyone, regardless of whether a person has a disability or not.  There’s generally a way to set the built environment up to make it easy to use for everybody, including children.

So ADA requirements are sort of a piece of universal design.  And the law does get pretty detailed about what you can and can’t do with regards to the size of your doorways and the width of your pathways and those sorts of things.  But that’s sort of like a bare minimum expectation really of what will be done that will create an environment that is just—at its most basic level—usable by everyone.

Universal design takes that a step past that, obviously, and trying to design something that’s usable for everybody.  So when we’re refreshing out branches, I pay attention to sort of all of those things.  We have to make sure that we’re designing to the basic level of the ADA standards that are countertop to the right height that if we’re putting in a catalog computer for people to look books up on, that we don’t put it on a standing workstation only that’s really just usable by people who are literally standing.  So if you’re using a walker or a wheelchair, then you wouldn’t reach it.

So we have whole range of things that I pay attention to with the refreshes.  And how we know what the stated concerns are with regards to our customers with disabilities, I speak with folks who have disabilities almost every day about their library services and what they want.

We have several mechanisms for feedback on our website as well.  And we have an advisory committee that is focused specifically on accessibility.  And they meet I believe that it is quarterly, and talk with us about the existing branches, what they see, what they sort of have on their wishlist of ideally this is what this library would be like.  And they have been walking the branches whose refreshes are coming up.  They’ve been walking through those with us to point out very specific things like the slope on the sidewalk outside Long Branch that is too steep or a door where the pushbutton for the handicap entrance, you know, somebody using a wheelchair without that push button can’t get in.  So they point those things out and make sure that we’re aware of them.  We make a nice big list, and then when we go into design for that building, we incorporate as much of that as we can.

David Watts:  There are a wide variety of disabilities from vision impairments to mobility challenges.  How does MCPL address or accommodate them all?

Elizabeth Lang:  There are a very wide variety of disabilities and we try to accommodate everyone.  We want everyone to come to the library and be delighted.  What we do is take a case-by-case basis, specifically when we have someone who has a concern, we will address that with the particular branch or staff person who has brought it to our attention.

There will be instances where people who have disabilities will have needs that conflict.  One example that seems kind of outrageous but kind of made the rounds online as a “Did you know this actually happened?”  Somebody who used seeing eye-dog, a guide dog, was attending an event, I honestly don’t remember which library, not in this area, and there was a person with a very, very, very severe asthma-related response to dogs and they both wanted to be in the same place and it became a point of great discussion whether the person with the guide dog was allowed to stay because that person is sort of impinging on another person’s ability to breath, which is no small issue, right?

David Watts:  That’s a pretty severe disability.

Elizabeth Lang:  It is.

David Watts:  Yeah.

Elizabeth Lang:  It is.  So that’s an extreme example, but I have had people asked me, “What happens if person A wants something and that interferes with what person B needs?”  So it does happen.  Thankfully I’ve not encountered anything in our system yet.  But again, we just take our customer’s needs on a case-by-case basis where we’re made aware that there’s something needed.

David Watts:  How do you get input about what Montgomery County residents who have disabilities want and need from MCPL?

Elizabeth Lang:  Well, I touched on this a little earlier.  We, in addition to our online feedback and the feedback that we get from our branches directly from customers, again, we have our advisory committee.  And in addition to the feedback that I get from them at our meetings, our formal meetings, I am in touch with them regularly to just bounce things off of them to ask their opinions, to get their guidance and their feedback on the things that we’re thinking about implementing or changing.  And then we also – I have fairly close relationship with the ADA Compliance Office, the Montgomery County ADA Compliance Office.  And they hear a lot more than we do directly from Montgomery County residents who have disabilities and specifically what they need.  And that’s sort of a two-way feedback street with them as well.

David Watts:  How does ADA influence architectural design in public spaces?  How do you believe it will impact libraries of the future?

Elizabeth Lang:  Well, as I’ve said, the ADA regulations do have sort of a basic set of kind of bare-bones guidelines as I think of them with regards to how physical spaces have to be designed to be accessible.  Things like designs you’ve probably seen that have the wording and then the Braille underneath them perhaps next to a meeting room door, those kinds of guidelines.

They specify things like if you have something that protrudes from the wall, say a monitor, maybe a computer monitor or a display screen that if it’s more than four inches up from the wall, it has to be either over a certain height, I believe 70 inches or below 28, so that if I’m using a cane, I’m not caught unawares by something that’s sticking out from the wall.  I might run into that with my shoulder or my head if that’s the only thing there.  So ADA requires that if something is sticking out more than four inches and it’s within those 28 to 70 inches, I have to have something permanent underneath it, like a bench or a cabinet that someone who’s using a cane would be able to feel with the cane before they hit the protruding object.

So there are a lot of very small detailed requirements like that that influence the architecture of a building.

In the future, again, I think we’re going to move toward a more universal design as people become more and more aware of what is good for everyone.  It’s really relatively easy to build to those things when you’re building a new facility.  Older facilities are harder to sometimes sort of bring up to speed.  But we haven’t encountered anything yet where there wasn’t something that we could do to make it better.

David Watts:  How does the increase in the number of older Americans impact ADA services and resources?

Elizabeth Lang:  Well, as you might guess, as our population ages, our ADA related services and resources will be in greater demand.  I was looking at some information from the Pew Research Center this morning that was talking about this very thing.  And it was seeing that as people age, they do become disabled.  And that our largest group of people with disabilities nationwide are those who I believe it was 75 and older.

So of folks who have disabilities, about 25% of them never go online.  You know, we talked a lot about how everybody is connected 24/7, but there are very large group of people who are not connected in that way.  People with disabilities are also 20% less likely than somebody without disabilities to own a computer, a tablet, or a smartphone.

So again, we’re maybe looking at the need to increase more basic resources, print books, print magazines, print newspapers, or providing the technology for our customers to use because they don’t own it themselves.  You know, helping them learn what those things are and connecting them in that way will be ever more important.

David Watts:  How can we find out more about MCPL’s resources for people with disabilities?

Elizabeth Lang:  Well, we have some good information on our website.  We do have what’s called a LibGuide that is specifically filled with information about our services for people who have disabilities, and not only our services at the library but some countywide, I believe there are also statewide resources there for people to use on a variety of topics.  They can always contact one of our branches and the librarians there can help them with any information needs that they have.  It’s kind of what we specialize in or they can contact me directly.  I’m at 240-777-0039.  I’m happy to talk to anyone about their concerns, their needs, or any topic related to library services about people with disabilities.

David Watts:  Elizabeth, we have this habit of asking our guest to tell us what they’re currently reading and is on their nightstand or what your favorite book is.

Elizabeth Lang:  I could never pick a favorite book.  So I’ll tell you what I’m reading right now.  On my mother’s recommendation, I’m reading the A is for Alibi series which I had always been sort of aware of.  A lot of people really love Sue Grafton’s writing.  I had just never picked it up.  But I just finished F is for Fugitive.  And tonight, yeah, I will be starting G is for Gumshoe.  It’s really great series, mystery, kind of –.

David Watts:  It draws you.

Elizabeth Lang:  It does.  It does.  They character is a great character.  The main character Kinsey Millhone is the investigator.  She is a private investigator who started as a policy officer and she is very quirky and kind of lovable in the end.  I’m loving it.  It’s fantastic.  My mom made a great recommendation.

David Watts:  Well, we want to thank you for being our guest today on Library Matters.

Elizabeth Lang:  Thank you for having me.

David Watts:  And for our audience, we want to keep the conversation going by following us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.  Don’t forget to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcast.

Also, please review and rate us on iTunes; we’d love to know what you think.  Thank you for listening to our conversation today, and we’ll see you next time.

Sep 12, 2017

Recording Date: August 8, 2017 

Episode Summary: Guest Elizabeth Lang discusses MCPL resources and services for people with disabilities, as well as MCPL's efforts to incorporate accessibility into all aspects of its operations.

Guest: Elizabeth Lang, Assistant Facilities and Accessibility Program Manager 

MCPL Resources and Services Mentioned During this Episode:

MCPL's Accessibility Centers are located in our Rockville Memorial and Silver Spring branches

Accessibility Advisory Committee

Assistive Technology Workstations

MCPL Services for People with Disabilities

Rockville Memorial Library Talking Book Club 

Other Resources and Services Mentioned During this Episode:

DC Center for Accessibility

Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped

Montgomery County ADA Compliance Team


National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped


Wolfner Talking Books & Braille Library
in Jefferson City, Missouri

Books Mentioned During this Episode:

Kinsey Milhone mystery series (A Is for Alibi, etc.) by Sue Grafton

Other Items of Interest:

Pew Research fact sheet on Americans with disabilities
Universal design

Full transcript of this episode.

Aug 29, 2017

Recording Date: Tuesday, August 8, 2017 

Episode Summary: Two MCPL dads discuss books for both new and experienced fathers. 

Guests: Fred Akuffo, Library Assistant Supervisor at Long Branch, and Tom Palmer, Library Associate at Silver Spring.

Notable Quote:  “I’m not sure I have a [parenting] style, honestly. I’m on the lookout for one.”

Books, Movies, Television Shows, and Audio Mentioned During this Episode:

Adventures in Odyssey online Christian audio drama

The Birth Partner by Penny Simkin

The Bible

Aesop’s Fables by Aesop

Dad’s Playbook by Tom Limbert

Be Prepared by Gary Greenberg

Betters Dads, Stronger Sons by Rick Johnson

Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters by Meg Meeker

Boy Scout Handbook from Boy Scouts of America

Black on White by Tana Hoban

Foundation by Isaac Asimov

Reading Rainbow Television show

The Truth About Money by Ric Edelman

Books and other resources not owned by MCPL may be available through our Marina & interlibrary loan services

Other Items of Interest Mentioned During this Episode: 

Choose your own story type books

Aug 15, 2017

Recording Date: July 11, 2017

Episode Summary: Today's teen books are more than broken hearts and vampires. Two of our librarians discuss what teen books have to offer readers of all ages. 

Guests: Tina Rawhouser, Manager of our Potomac branch, and Annie Seiler, librarian at Marilyn Praisner

MCPL Resources and Services Mentioned During this Episode:

Teen Reading Lists: MCPL offers suggested readings lists by topic/genre for teens. Includes action/adventure, humor, mystery, and more. MCPL also offers reading lists by age, for middle schoolers and high schoolers

Teensite: This portion of our website just for teens offers reading suggestions, library events for teens, college admissions info, and more. 

What Do I Check Out Next?: Use our online form to tell us what you like to read. We'll e-mail you a list of 3-5 books that our readers' advisory experts have chosen for you. 

Books and Authors Mentioned During this Episode:

Leigh Bardugo: One of Annie's favorite authors. Bardugo's teen fantasy books include the Grisha triology, about a teenage orphan who harnesses an unexpected power. The first book in the series is Shadow and Bone

Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys: It's 1941, and 15 year old Lithuanian girl Lina and her family are sent to Siberia, where she secretly documents their struggle to survive.

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak: Liesel, a young German girl, boosts the spirits of her neighbors and the Jewish man her family is hiding from the Nazis with her storytelling and recitation of books she's stolen. This book was made into a film.

Orson Scott Card: Bestselling author of Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and many other science fiction and fantasy books. 

Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman: One of Tina Rawhouser's favorite books, Challenger Deep is the story of Caden Bosch, whose descent into schizophrenia splits his world into one of a high school student and the other of a sea captain on his way to Challenger Deep, the ocean's deepest trench.   

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas: Starr Carter lives in two worlds, her poor neighborhood and the fancy prep school she attends. Those worlds collide when she witnesses the fatal shooting of her best friend at the hands of a police officer.

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien: The classic fantasy tale of a small, reluctant traveler who is pressured to join a group of dwarfs on a quest to retrieve their treasure from a dragon. 

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott: Recounts the joys and sorrows of the 4 March sisters as they grow up in the latter half of the 19th century. 

The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien: The epic trilogy recounting the quest of Frodo Baggins and his companions to destroy the One Ring before its creator retrieves it and conquers Middle Earth. The books in this series are The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King

Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold: 14 year old Susie Salmon watches from heaven as her family adjusts to the tragedy of her disappearance and death. 

The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer: One of Tina Rawhouser's favorites, the Lunar Chronicles is a sci fi series reinterpreting Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, and other fairy tales. The story is set in a future of moon colonies, androids, and cyborgs. 

Sarah J. Maas: Author of the Throne of Glass series, a retelling of Cinderella, and A Court of Thorns and Roses series, a retelling of Beauty and the Beast. Librarian Annie Seiler likes these books for their strong female characters.

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson: A favorite of Librarian Annie Seiler, this graphic novel recounts the adventures of Nimona, the sidekick to supervillain Lord Blackheart, who's attempting to unmask the evil deeds of the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline: Living in a bleak near future, Wade Watts dreams of finding the 3 keys supposedly hidden in the virtual reality world OASIS. Rumor has it that whoever finds all 3 will inherit a fortune. 

Sabaa Tahir: Teen fiction writer best known for the novel An Ember in the Ashes.  

Salt to the Sea: A historical fiction novel about a group refugees in East Prussia seeking to flee the final ravages of World War II. 

The Selection by Kiera Cass: First book in a series about a competition to win the prince's hand and become a princess. 

Sweet Valley High: Book series about the lives of identical twins, Jessica and Elizabeth, and their experiences at Sweet Valley High School. 

This Is Our Story: Five boys go hunting, only four return. The boys say it was an accident, but suspicions mount. 

Wee Free Men by Terry Pratchett. A young witch joins a group of 6 inch tall blue men to rescue her baby brother and save Fairyland. 

Aug 1, 2017

Recording Date: June 13, 2017

Episode Summary: Learn more about the hosts of Library Matters, Alessandro Russo and David Watts. Alessandro and David talk about how they established their careers with MCPL and what it's like to work in a public library. 

Guests: Alessandro Russo and David Watts

Guest Hosts: Adrienne Miles Holderbaum and Mark Santoro, co-producers of Library Matters

MCPL Resources and Services Mentioned During this Episode:

3D Printing - Create a variety of objects both fun and functional with MCPL's 3D printers. 

MCPL offers a wide variety of e-books, audiobooks, and e-magazines for children, teens, and adults. 

Books and Podcasts Mentioned During this Episode:

Baudolino by Umberto Eco. A lighthearted tale of an upwardly mobile peasant, Baudolino, who, in the early 1200s, rises through medieval society and sets out to meet the legendary Prester John

Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Dumas' classic tale of a falsely imprisoned man who seeks vengeance against those who betrayed him.

David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell. Gladwell reveals the unexpected relationships and balance between the weak and the strong. 

The Nerdist. Host Chris Hardwick and his two nerdy friends Jonah Ray and Matt Mira talk about stuff, "usually with someone more famous" than they are. 

Paranormal. Jim Harold interviews experts on the supernatural. 

Two Pods a Day. A campaign to introduce listeners to 2 independent podcasts each day, from May 15 - June 13, 2017.

Other Items of Interest

Guidelines Governing the Use of Public Libraries - These library use guidelines, based on the principles of mutual respect and courtesy, are meant to foster a welcoming environment in all MCPL branches. 

Applying for a job with MCPL - Once at the jobs search page, type the word library into the Keywords field to bring up jobs available in MCPL. For specific instructions on becoming a library page, please visit the Library Page Positions site

Jul 18, 2017

Recording Date: July 11, 2017

Episode Summary: Alessandro Russo and guest host Lennea Bower* interview retiring MCPL Director Parker Hamilton about her career in librarianship, her 37 years with Montgomery County government, and her work as director of MCPL.

*Lennea Bower is the manager of Digital Strategies, the MCPL division responsible for the Library Matters podcast.  

Guest: MCPL Director Parker Hamilton. Director Hamilton has led MCPL since 2005. She is retiring July 31, 2017

Notable Quote: Director Hamilton on why she because a librarian “because it was an opportunity to connect with learning and knowledge.”

MCPL Resources and Services Mentioned During This Episode

Apps: MCPL offers a variety of apps that connect customers to library resource, including Bookmyne, a mobile version of our catalog, Freegal, a free music app, several e-book apps, and more.

Career Online High School (COHS): COHS is an accredited, online high school diploma and career certificate program for adults 19 and older. 

Digital Media Labs: Our Long Branch and Silver Spring libraries offer computer labs where teens can learn and practice digital photography, video production, graphic design, computer programming, and more. 

Fake News: This library program offers strategies for evaluating news stories and other information sources. 

Go! Kits: Little Explorer and Young Voyager Go! Kits are backpacks that contain a Playaway Launchpad or Android tablet as well as STEM related books, tools, and apps. Their purpose is to get children excited about science and math. 

MCPL's social media channels: Blogger, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter, and YouTube

Books, and Podcasts Shows Mentioned During This Episode

Car TalkHumorous NPR talk show that ran from 1977 - 2012 featuring two brothers from Boston who helped, or tried to help, members of the audience who called in with their car troubles. 

Gift from the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh: Collection of meditations on the changes women experience in relationships, marriage, and life as they move through life's stages.

Kurt Vonneguys: Podcast of two guys discussing Kurt Vonnegut's books.

National Public Radio (NPR) Podcasts: NPR offers a large variety of podcasts, some of which serve as online archives of NPR radio shows, including Fresh Air, Car Talk, and StoryCorps. 

Ways of Grace: Stories of Activism, Adversity, and How Sports Can Bring Us Together by James Blake: A collection of stories about acts of kindness in the world of sports that bridged cultural and racial divides. The author was interviewed on NPR about this book.  

Other Items of Interest

Bobby Seale: Political activist and co-founder of the Black Panther Party. He spoke at the Douglas Center Library in Illinois while Parker Hamilton worked there. 

FY17 MCPL Budget

Jun 26, 2017

Recording Date: June 13, 2017

Episode Summary: MCPL children's librarians Jane Dorfman and Lauren Martino continue their discussion on reading aloud to children. In this portion, part 2 of 2, Jane and Lauren read sample stories, explain why these stories are good read-alouds, and note some of the techniques they used to bring these stories to life. Our guests also answer questions that they have heard from parents over the years about reading aloud to children.

NOTE; This recording is part 2 of 2 of the Reading Aloud to a Child epsiode. We had such an interesting discussion that our recording for this episode was over 45 minutes. We've split the discussion up into 2 parts to make it easier for our listeners to absorb. 

Guests: Jane Dorfman, MCPL Children's Librarian, and Lauren Martino, MCPL Children's Librarian

Books read during this episode:

Bark George by Jules Feiffer. Read by Jane Dorfman. A mother dog is concerned because her puppy doesn't bark. 

The Monster at the End of this Book by Jon Stone. Read by Lauren Martino. Grover becomes concerned when he learns there's monster waiting at the end of his book. 

MCPL resources and services mentioned during this episode:

Wordless books: These are books, often picture books, that have only pictures and no words. 

World Languages Collection: Numerous MCPL branches offer adult and children's books (and some periodicals) in Amharic, Chinese, Farsi, French, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese. 

Authors mentioned during this episode:

Sandra Boynton. Author of many colorful, humorous picture books featuring cheerful, often musical, animals. Her books include such favorites as Are You a Cow?, Tickle Time!, and Barnyard Dance!.

Books mentioned during this episode:

B Is for Betsy by Carolyn Haywood. Betsy is nervous about going to first grade, but learns it's a great place where she has lots of fun. 

Big Dog Little Dog series by Dav Pilkey. Big Dog and Little Dog are best friends who can be a bit mischievous and silly. 

Bread and Jam for Frances by Russell Hoban. Frances declares she will only eat bread and jam. To her surprise, her parents agree. 

The Great Brain series by John Fitzgerald. The Great Brain is a boy growing up in the early 1900s with a silver tongue and a knack for making a profit. 

*Magician's Assistant by Ann Patchett. A magician's assistant travels to Nebraska in search of her late magician's secret past. 

*Redshirts by John Scalzi. An ensign on the flagship of the interstellar navy learns that life on a starship is a lot more complicated, and deadly, than he realized.

Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor. The children of a black family living in Depression era Mississippi do not understand the prejudice and discrimination they face.

*A Wrinkle in Time by Madelein L'Engle. A brother, sister, and their friends search for the sibling's father, who has disappeared after working on a secret project for the government. 

*Mentioned by our guests as their favorite books.

Other items of interest:

International Children's Digital Library.  A digital library of full-text books from around the world.  

1 2 Next »