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Library Matters

Library Matters is a podcast by Montgomery County Public Libraries exploring the world of books, libraries, technology, and learning.
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Library Matters is a podcast of Montgomery County Public Libraries (MCPL) in Montgomery County, MD. Each episode we explore the world of books, libraries, technology, and learning. Library Matters is hosted by Julie Dina, Outreach Associate, Lauren Martino, Children's Librarian at our Silver Spring branch, and David Payne, Branch Manager of our Davis branch and Acting Branch Manager of our Potomac branch.  

Feb 28, 2018

Listen to the audio

David Payne:  Welcome to Library Matters with your host David Payne.

 

Julie Dina:  And I'm Julie Dina.

 

David Payne:  And today it's movie night.  Get your popcorn ready.  We are going to the movies.  It's that time of year for the Academy Awards, better known as the Oscars.  So what better to talk about movies in the company of MCPL’s great movie buffs, Fred Akuffo from the circulation department at Long Branch.  Welcome, Fred.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Thank you.

 

David Payne:  And David Watts from the circulation department at Silver Spring library.  Welcome, David.

 

David Watts:  Good to be here.

 

David Payne:  I should actually say welcome back because listeners may remember David as a host on Library Matters last year.

 

David Watts:  It’s good to be back.

 

David Payne:  And as I mentioned Fred and David are two of our greatest movie buffs in the library system, so we look forward to hearing from you about the movies today on what is a very gray February Wednesday just a right day for watching movies.

 

David Watts:  Let’s light this thing up.

 

David Payne:  That's right.  So let’s start with a bit about yourselves.  Fred, may if I can turn to you tell us about yourself and your passion for movies.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Okay, well I'm Fred Akuffo.  I work at the Long Branch library.  I’ve been an extreme movie fan for all my life.  I like watching movies that a lot of people don't like watching those are my favorite kind.  I like movies off the beaten path like a lot of my friends don't watch cowboy movies anymore, but those are my favorites.  I like movies where the director makes the most out of a low budget.  Those are my kind of movies.

 

So B-Movies are very fun to me to see what they can do with the limited resources they have.  But then again, I also like movies that are very compelling too.  So movies that go on a different angle than your usual movie out there.  So I like them to steer me in a way I wasn't expecting.  But again, I pretty much watch anything that's out there.  I even though watch La La Land would surprise me.  So yeah, I'm up for a pretty much anything when it comes to film.

 

David Payne:  That’s great.  Thank you and David.

 

David Watts:  I'm a classic movie lover who it’s my side passion just to go to the movies.  I can remember my first movie my aunt took me to see Sound of Music in 1965, at the Silver Theatre, which is now the AFI in Silver Spring and it’s a great place to watch a movie.  I go to probably 30 movies a year.  I'm more the big budget type.  So Fred, where I’m weak, Fred is strong.

 

David Payne:  All right, let’s blend, let’s blend.

 

Julie Dina:  That’s good.

 

David Watts:  I date my life according to what movie was out at the moment.  My right of passage was Star Wars in 1977 I was 16.

 

David Payne:  And still going.

 

David Watts:  And still going.  Took my wife to see Color Purple that was our first movie together.

 

Julie Dina:  Yeah, nice color.

 

David Watts:  So, yeah, can remember different times of my life based on the movie that was out, yeah.

 

David Payne:  Yeah, that’s great.  Well, we got two very interesting magnificent people I’d say which is great.

 

Julie Dina:  The key thing is they balance each other.  [Laughs] So since you guys are movie buffs I'm sure you're aware of the Academy Awards.  So can you tell us what you enjoy most or least about the Academy Awards, what is something you really enjoyed?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Well, the least I enjoy about the Academy Awards is I don't think they give all of film the same look.  For example, you’ll have your urban street films.  I watch Urbanstreet Films on YouTube a lot and there is a lot of them.  But you know, because of the poor acting sometimes the directing isn’t is up to par.  But some of them are great stories and you'll never see any kind of mention.  It’s not that they have to win or anything but you’ll never see any kind of mention of Urbanstreet film or somebody trying to promote that.  The subject matter isn’t all that great but training days Urbanstreet film.  And Denzel Washington had a win for that.  So there is room for it.  So I think they still need to branch out more to some of the more unpopular areas of film making.

 

David Watts:  I think they're searching to be more inclusive part of what limits that or the rules that govern the Academy motion picture arts and sciences.  You know, they have 6000 members who are voting members and not all of them are with the current culture.  So I think they have tried to -- recently they voted to put a limit on how long you can have not actually been in a movie and still vote, which is 10 years now.  So I think that's going to increase the diversity.

 

Another requirement that probably keeps a lot of street movies out is most people don't realize this but only motion pictures that have had a seven day run in Los Angeles qualify to be in the Academy Awards voting.  So if you commercially can get your film into a theater for seven days there is no way that is going to be viewed or voted on by the Academy.  So I think they are hopeful to broaden themselves and I think we see our whole culture evolving.  So certainly you would hope they would become much more diverse.

 

David Payne:  So do you think I mean, we’re now in the 90th year of the Oscars and obviously times have changed considerably since the earlier years, do you think it's a case of the Academy is sort of struggling to keep up?

 

Fred Akuffo:  No, I think it’s actually kind of what Dave just mentioned.  I mean, when you go by a certain rules for so long sometimes you have to evaluate your rules.  You know, it’s like everything, business, whatever, Amazon changed the rules, Netflix changed the rules.  And it’s probably a good thing that the Academy has taken at least some steps towards you know –.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, and I think 2016 was instructive for them when they had their “wide out” and it sort of awaken them to need to refresh the rules that were governing their body and to try to be more towards what the public likes but not so much, not so much.  And that’s his challenge you know that's the part for me.  I enjoy seeing movie stars.  I enjoy seeing people in our culture who are larger than life.  And I'm not putting them up on a pedestal but I mean, they’re attractive people and they live a glamorous lifestyle.  And while we might not aspire to that you do have to admire it in some sense.  So I think that's the great thing about the Oscars to me.

 

Julie Dina:  How about you Fred, what do you like about it?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Well, like that is a gaze to success.  So you know, it's something that you're aiming for or maybe not aiming for but if you can achieve, then you can be put in a group with other folks who’ve done so.  And if you can achieve more than once, then you can actually change movies and change film, change future direction in movies.  So whereas one film may have never gotten a look at one moment 15 years later ago now everybody is doing it so you know sometimes it can be a motivator.

 

David Payne:  So let's turn to this year's Academy Awards.  What do you think of this year's Academy Award nominees? Let's start with David.

 

David Watts:  I've seen eight of the 10 nominees.  I think it's probably on the scale of most years a weak crop.  There is really not a blockbuster.  They tend to be more towards the eclectic artsy side.  Many would say a more towards the MD side of the business.  So each of them make a statement and that’s the important thing about movies is what do they say to us as a culture and as a people.  And what do we use as a launchpad for conversations based on our seeing those movies and relating to them.

 

David Payne:  Fred, any thoughts?

 

Fred Akuffo:  I agree.  I don't think it was as strong as is before.  I notice that this year I don't hear people talking about man, you’ve just got to see this you know or you just got to see that and I know this one is going to win.  To me there is more of an up in the air feeling this year in terms of the nominees.  So but I don’t mind that I mean, you know to me being more up in the air is actually better.  It just gives more motivation for people to push and making their films more distinctive.  It's I think is still moving forward is just this is not the hottest year so far.

 

Julie Dina:  Maybe next year.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, there is always next year that’s the great part of our film, there is always next year and people start working on it now.

 

Julie Dina:  Is there any movie that was actually nominated that you’ve seen that either of you have seen but think hardly anyone else has seen yet and could you tell us about that movie?

 

David Watts:  I think you probably consider the whole crop.  I mean, this was a terrible year at the box office.  There are historically low box office figures for this year.  So I think you would be certainly able to say that about most of the films that are in the best picture category.  I saw Three Billboards in Ebbing Missouri, which is on its face, not a title, it causes you to run out and buy a movie ticket, but it was an excellent movie.  Probably the biggest budget one in the top 10, The shape of Water of seeing Shape of Water.  So I presume that most of the movie going public is going to be basing its opinions based on whether or not they've seen Shape of Water because that certainly will be the ones that the movie industry is behind and pumping to try to see win as many categories as possible to try to get people to go to the movies and see it.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Actually, I think I'll also add Moonlight.  I think there is quite a few people that haven’t seen Moonlight.

 

David Watts:  Yeah.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Good movie.  I didn't even want to see it but after watching it I was you know –.

 

David Watts:  I thought it was terribly depressing.  [Laughs] And I think halfway through when they said well, we call the wrong movie its Moonlight.  I said, oh my goodness.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah.

 

David Watts:  That was probably my least favorite from last year.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, that's kind of my thing though.  I like movies that you know some people when they’re going through it they’re really going through it for real.  And that’s one movie where if you come out of that at the end of the movie it’s like come on, it doesn't really work like that.  You know, what I mean.  So I like movies that represent some of what people are really, really dealing with.  And it's still an extreme case, you know that movie but –.

 

David Watts:  I don't think people like to go to the movie and feel bad when they leave.

 

Fred Akuffo:  That’s true, that’s true.

 

David Watts:  And that’s always been my thing.  I never really been much in the Spike Lee because he always ends his movies on a downbeat.  And you spend your hard-earned money you want to come out feeling like your life is better somehow for having seen the movie.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Right.

 

David Watts:  And that was just my take on Moonlight.

 

Fred Akuffo:  For me sometimes it's I'm glad that's not me and so my life is better.  [Laughs]

 

Julie Dina:  That’s another way to think.

 

David Watts:  Things aren’t so great.

 

Fred Akuffo:  That’s right I can go out of here.  Man, I'm glad I'm not him.  Okay, okay.

 

David Payne:  With your two very different interests in movies here is an interesting question, what's the most obscure Oscar-winning movie you've ever watched?

 

David Watts:  Come on Mr. B-Movies.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Now Quentin Tarantino, has he gotten any of them?

 

David Watts:  As best picture, no.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, okay.

 

Julie Dina:  He didn’t get one for the Pulp Fiction.

 

David Watts:  Wait a minute, I’ve got my cheat sheet here.  Pulp Fiction, no.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Or the one with Jamie Foxx.

 

Julie Dina:  Django.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Django.

 

David Watts:  No, certainly not.  [Laughs].  Surely you jest. I saw the most obscure movies obviously to American movie public are the foreign films and I saw Indochine in ’92 that was a very good movie.  It was about French Indochina in the 1920s.  And the female lead in that movie god, her name gets away from me, she is very popular.  But anyways she'd raised a child.  She'd raised an orphan and they later fell in love with the same soldier, which was made for an interesting kind of dynamic –.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Okay.

 

David Payne:  Sounds very complicated.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, it’s very complicated and the movie didn't end with a conclusion that allows you to close your mind to this particular movie.  But it was a very good movie and it won for best foreign film in 1992.  And I thought it was a particularly good movie.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah.

 

David Watts:  Then another obscure one maybe not so obscure was Hidden Dragon.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, yeah.

 

David Watts:  Crouching Tiger won for foreign film I think in 2000 I’m not positive on the year on that but that was a very good movie, very entertaining.

 

Julie Dina:  I really liked that.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, for kids who grew up with Bruce Lee movies it was particularly gratifying to see.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, I liked that a lot because I’m a heavy, heavy martial arts film enthusiast.

 

David Watts:  So you could really get into that and relate to that one, yeah.

 

Fred Akuffo:  I could get into that.

 

David Watts:  And flying, kicking scenes and all.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Not as much the flying around and stuff because I'm more of the –.

 

David Watts:  The true martial arts.

 

Fred Akuffo:  The pre Bruce Lee type.  So I actually think Bruce Lee destroyed martial arts film because he cause a fight scenes to end in like one second whereas before it would be like two minutes for a fight scene to take place.  So you know, I'll keep my [Multiple Speakers].  But yeah, that was one.  One I thought was obscure and probably because I didn't know anything at all about I guess the culture but The Piano I think won, right.

 

David Watts:  Yes.

 

Fred Akuffo:  And at the time I watched I found it obscure.

 

David Payne:  It takes a bit of re-watching.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah.

 

Julie Dina:  And now a brief message about MCPL services and resources.

 

Febe Huezo:  Watching the Oscars or Golden Globe Award ceremonies is fun to do with friends.  But it's even better to watch the films themselves.  With my MCPL card I can borrow award-winning movies for free.  There is nothing better than browsing the DVD collection at my library.  Stop by our branch today or check this episode show notes for more information about our DVD collection.

 

Julie Dina:  Now back to our program.

 

David Payne:  Well, Oscars certainly has a history of going counterculture and so you always have to be careful of that.  When the artist won in 2012, I think I broke my TV because it was –.

 

Fred Akuffo:  The black and white or --.

 

David Watts:  Well, no and not even for that reason I mean, I've watched extensively silent movies and that wasn't a particularly good silent movie.  But that was the hot or in thing just let us last year with lot I mean, a year before last with La La Land we got the same thing.  La La Land was okay but if you're really in the movies and you're really into musicals La La Land sucked.  Excuse me, if I shouldn’t say that.

 

Julie Dina:  So as we are all aware especially both of you there are 24 categories in the Oscars.  If you could change or add to any of them what exactly would it be?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Fight choreography would be one I’d put in.  I think they need to think about that kind of quality in the movies.  You know, when you have action you wanted to look as real as possible.

 

David Watts:  Absolutely.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Well, maybe not.  Sometimes you wanted to look as vague as possible, but within passing reality if that makes any sense.  Sometimes the Return of the Jedi, the fight scenes look great.  I mean, that returned into the Star Wars fighting looks great.  But then in the next movie is a different fight choreography and it doesn't look so hot.  But if they were let's say a category for that you’d always make it look good.  So you know it would make for better action movies.  You know, what I mean.  And then one I don't necessarily need is the sound group or whatever you know that always wins.  They can win it but you don’t need like 15 minutes in the show to show it.  But I’m sure those sound guys work hard so they deserve it.

 

David Watts:  Yes and big ups to our sound guys.  [Laughs]

 

Fred Akuffo:  There is a place, sorry.

 

David Watts:  I would say we need to add a comic con section because we have all of these superheroes now and certainly I think they need a category unto themselves where their movies aren’t judged against the dramatic movies.

 

David Payne:  So looking ahead to this year's awards you both mentioned it doesn't look like a great year as far as the movie quality.  But can you guess which movie will take home the most Oscars this year?

 

David Watts:  It would be Shape of Water.  I mean, it's a big budget film with a big studio behind it.  I believe it's nominated for 13 Academys of which it probably will take home seven to eight.  The juries do allow over whether it's the best picture.  The female leading actress who did a phenomenal job probably is going to lose to Frances McDormand who will win for Three Billboards.  The male lead did a particularly good job but he is not there yet.  He will probably win in a year or two.  This year belongs to Gary Oldman who will win for Darkest Hour.  His performance was phenomenal although it was hard to believe that he was Winston Churchill.  No, slide aside the prosthetics were not very good but his performance was excellent.  Winston Churchill certainly is a historic figure renowned for his strength of will and force of character and Oldman did an excellent job portraying that.

 

David Payne:  Fred, any thoughts?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah and I haven't got into those yet.  Although I do think the subject matter for Billboards will probably have some to do with.  I think people you know there is like a non-trusting aspect in society now for different authorities, different entities and things like that.  And that kind of speaks to it on you know make sure these people do what they say they’re going to do it all that kind of thing.  So I think that'll have some to do with in impact.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, Michael Sharon was the actor I couldn't think of who was in Shape of Water and is nominated for best actor.  I don't think he will win, but I think he is coming.  He is in more and more feature films and he does an excellent job portraying the characters.  I do think that Margot Robbie is making some heads turn so while she won't win as best actress she is another one who is on the way.  She is establishing herself.

 

Julie Dina:  Okay, so on another note, since that we know our customers will be listening to this podcast they’ll probably come run into the branches.  What are you both doing at your branches to celebrate the Oscars?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Well, at my branch we have a display at the front of the circ desk that's off from the DVD collection.  And that display has what I would call the higher-quality newer movies sitting on it.  So these are movies that are 2018, ‘17 that by customer rating rate over a certain amount.  And I find that folks as soon as they come through the door shoot right to that display get their things and get their movies that they're looking for that they are surprised to see sometimes and then head on out.  So other the Oscar movies are on there along with some other movies that are of the same quality but maybe just not as popular.  So just one little thing you do that kind of boost that level of interest for those people who enjoy film.

 

David Payne:  And just a reminder that’s at Long Branch.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Long Branch library, yeah.

 

Julie Dina:  You also serve popcorn?

 

Fred Akuffo:  No, not yet.  But I do give suggestions and our oral reviews of the ones that I have watched off of that display rack which people seem to enjoy.  And also they’ll bring it over and ask me, what do you think about this, what do you think about that and they want to know what I really think.  You know what I mean.  So I try to give them my best on that.

 

David Payne:  So there you have the listeners you want to about a movie go to Long Branch.

 

Julie Dina:  Go to Long Branch.  How about you David?

 

David Watts:  Yeah, we’re putting out a book display I just talked with our senior librarian and we’re doing a book display on the books that were adapted into movies To Kill a Mockingbird, Godfather, which is my all-time favorite.  There is several books that have been adapted and we’re going to feature those books in a display near our circulation desk.

 

David Payne:  So let's look ahead further into the year and pause the Oscars themselves.  Which 2018 to be released films are you both looking for to seeing?

 

David Watts:  I never look ahead.  I hate to be a kill joy.

 

Fred Akuffo:  You just name as they come.

 

David Watts:  Well, yeah, I focus on what's current what’s out although I'm sure there are some interesting things coming.  My daughter was telling me that the follow-up to Justice League is the optimal war or something along those lines.  And I assured her it won't be a final one.  She said, dad, this is the last one.  I said, no, it’s not.

 

David Payne:  Just like Star Wars.

 

David Watts:  It’s not the last one.

 

David Payne:  Fred.

 

Fred Akuffo:  I’m looking forward to the Hans Solo part of that.  I guess it’s part of that series.

 

David Watts:  Yes.

 

David Payne:  So, I like the last one they did so which surprised me because I didn't like Rogue One, but yeah, they build on it.  I think it'll win.  Everybody wants to know the origin know of Hans Solo of what, who in the world he is so I think it’ll be another successful one.

 

Julie Dina:  So it's obvious you guys watch a lot of movies.  However, I am wondering, do you actually go to the movie theater to watch these movies and if you do, do you prefer watching it on the big screen compared to watching it at home?

 

Fred Akuffo:  This feels like a confessional.  [Multiple Speakers] No, I'm probably not like my man Dave here.  I don’t do 30 a year.  And I definitely don’t do them at the movie theater just because you know I got two kids.  By the time I'm getting out there we’re talking like $90 you know what I mean.  So it's a little bit pricey.

 

David Payne:  Oh, you can't take them for it.  Your passion is not their passion.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Surprisingly my son is definitely a movie guy.  He comes to me and says hey, dad, you got to check this new movie out.

 

Julie Dina:  Wow.

 

Fred Akuffo:  And he is when I'm talking about films he is very eager to hear what I think about them.  So for like The Avengers, The Justice Leagues you know and I tell him things like, you know, I don’t like those guys because or Batman, let’s put the Batman.  I’m not a fan of Batman.  And he is like how can you not be a fan of Batman.  I’m like because Batman didn’t have any superpowers.  And so he is very interested in why I don't like certain things and he looks forward to seeing movies that I do like so that he can see how else he can experience the movies.  You know, what I mean.  So it’s kind of interesting.  But yeah, going to the theater is a little bit challenging, more challenging than it was when I was younger so.

 

Julie Dina:  Have you thought about coupons?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, I would need it.  I would need a $30 coupon you know, right.  I mean, we’re talking about I mean, when I was going to the theatre it’s like you could go to a dollar theater, dollar movie.

 

Julie Dina:  It’s true.

 

David Payne:  No such thing.

 

Julie Dina:  I used to go to go to those.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Now, a dollar you can’t even –.

 

Julie Dina:  You can buy popcorn.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Nothing, you know, there is nothing for a dollar.  In fact the candy is almost as much as the movie.  So it’s tremendous.

 

David Watts:  Well, let me tell you my secret.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Okay, give me one.

 

David Watts:  We live parallel lives here so I do know that you get a day off during a week and if you go to the first show AMC is $5, okay.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Okay.

 

David Watts:  So as long as you don’t drag your crumb snatchers along, it's a pretty reasonable venture and it’s a good escape and it also helps I think center you given your responsibilities and duties this in the library.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Definitely.

 

David Watts:  You need some time alone.  You need some destressing and that's what I use the movies for.  I watch movies at home and at the movies I watch classic movies at home and really that's my forte.

 

Julie Dina:  I love classic movies.

 

David Watts:  I’m a classic movie watcher of the 100 or so movies that have been best picture I've seen 98 of the 100.  So that's because I really get into classic movies.  The modern movies I like the ones who are near the top of the crop.  Not so much like Fred, I'm not digging down in the bargain bin to watch your first effort.

 

Fred Akuffo:  I love the bargain bin.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, I’m not doing that.  But one of the things that has changed with movies overtime is dialog has changed and as you talked about sound, the reason they give those awards for sound is because it's particularly difficult to balance dialog and sound effects.  And when you go to the theater you’ll because of Dolby technology you’ll hear that thumping base but then you'll get to the dialog part as Mark is motioning to me speak up, speak up, speak up and that's how you know you really didn't have the best sound guy.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Right.

 

David Watts:  And you don't have that with the classic movies.  The classic movies used smaller ensemble cast.  It was easy to understand who the characters were and they had to play off of each other.  Now, you have huge amounts of cast in movies you know that are in double digits that they never did.  In the classic age of movies they never had more than 10 actors in a movie.  So it was very easy to know the characters, to know the plot, to understand, to not have your brains blown out by base in the sound effects.  They threw in sound effects, but they weren’t for the purposes of waking people up as they are now.  They used the sound effects in modern movies to keep a somnolent moviegoer from falling asleep.

 

Fred Akuffo:  So to me, I look at as a little different.  Like let's take John Wick pure action.  There is nothing to think about except what you’re looking at in front of you.  The sound part, although I don't --.

 

David Watts:  But John Wick is ultraviolet.  You could not have taken your kids today.

 

Fred Akuffo:  No, no, we didn’t go to that long way.

 

David Watts:  Please tell me you did not take your –.

 

Fred Akuffo:  That’s my $5 I bought myself.  [Laughs] But that one where they shoot the guns and you can hear the bullet shells hit the floor, you know that's where your sound and dialog that you know for so John Wick there is no dialog.  So that's kind of where I look forward to, you know, the sound even though I don't want them to take 15 minutes in the award ceremony.  But so I do appreciate them but yeah, there is a catch, Catch-22 to all that, I guess you know.

 

David Payne:  Okay, so we usually end our interviews asking the guests what they are reading right now.  Perhaps we should ask you what you’re watching Fred.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Let's see.  The last thing I watched DVD I watched was a series called Insecure.  You know, I’m finding the series to be pretty entertaining as well as you know the feature films.  So I'm getting into a lot of the series.  So Insecure is about a young lady trying to manage her young life in the workforce in I guess is Los Angeles with all of what society has to offer some of it pleasant, some of it not so pleasant.

 

It's one that a lot of the young folks are watching.  Other series like you know Newsroom, Deadwood different series that talked about different things that I don't really experience.  I’m not in the new circuit.  I'm not in the wild frontier, but those movies did a very good job of depicting those particular types of lifestyle.  So I like watching series for that kind of thing to be transported in a believable sense to another place.

 

David Payne:  Great and David.

 

David Watts:  Well, I'm doing it all.  I consume it in every way possible.  Last movie, All The King’s Men with Broderick Crawford 1949 Oscar winner.  I just finished Midnight Line by Lee Child is part of a Jack Reacher series.  I’m reading Origin by Dan Brown, big Dan Brown fan.  So yeah, whatever way I can get content I’m upon it.

 

David Payne:  Sounds like you have it.

 

David Watts:  I have it, yeah.

 

Fred Akuffo:  I’d tell you one of my latest watches that I really liked was Fences.  I thought that was a different kind of look for somebody who is a major film player.  So I thought Denzel playing a broken guy who –.

 

David Watts:  Well, he actually won the Tony for that performance.  He should've won the Oscar.

 

Fred Akuffo:  He should have, yeah.

 

David Watts:  He should have won the Oscar and that was my disappointment with Moonlight, yes.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Right, because I thought it was very well done.  I thought it was realistic.  You know, I thought it was –.

 

David Watts:  It was passionate.

 

Fred Akuffo:  I thought it was a passionate centered performance you know, and the compelling part was that he wasn't running away or he didn’t let the character run away from you know life’s ills.

 

David Watts:  Then he should have won best actor for that that Casey Affleck won for Manchester by the Sea which was another depressing movie.  Denzel was robbed but he has been robbed many times during his career.  He was robbed in Hurricane when Kevin Spacey beat him out for American Beauty.  He was also robbed for his performance in Malcolm X.  He is certainly was well deserving for Fences, yes, absolutely.

 

Fred Akuffo:  So if you’re dad out there pick up Fences it’s a good one.

 

David Watts:  And I just wanted so you know he is the actor of my time.  You know, a lot of people where Daniel Day-Lewis is nominated this year for Phantom Thread and that was a disappointing movie and a disappointing performance from Daniel Day-Lewis.  But those are two penultimate actors of my age group.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Daniel Day-Lewis is definitely my guy too, yeah definitely.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, he is Denzel and Daniel Day-Lewis and you know that's one of the wonderful things about movies.  I can look back at different eras and see people who dominated the movies during those periods.  Sidney Poitier, he was particularly strong actor in the 60s.  You go in the 40s it was Bogey.  You go in the 50s, Brando, On The Waterfront.  So it’s just amazing to look back over your life and see how these artists affect you both visually and you know viscerally because they do.  You go to the movies and you feel emotive.  You want to express yourself as you come out.  You go to a love story and you feel love.  You go to a tearjerker and you come out crying.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, I got some stuck in my throat.

 

David Watts:  Yeah, exactly, you’re not crying.  My wife always says, yeah, crying over there, are you?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Well, I cannot swallow, you know.  [Laughs] Actually that’s how I give a movie credit.  If it can make me tough to swallow then I know you did something.

 

David Watts:  Brian's Song, right?

 

Fred Akuffo:  Well, more like let’s say De Niro in um, is it the Awakening when he was they were trying some research Robert Williams and De Niro, yeah that was a that had me swallowing and trying, yeah, I couldn’t get it down.

 

Julie Dina:  But you weren’t crying.

 

Fred Akuffo:  Yeah, I’m not all the way, not all the way, yeah.

 

Julie Dina:  Well, this has been very, very entertaining and I would like to thank you David and Fred for joining us today.

 

Fred Akuffo:  No, we’re happy to be here.

 

David Watts:  Thank you for having us, yeah.

 

Julie Dina:  Let's keep the conversation going by following us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.  Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast on the new Apple podcast app, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts.  Also, please review and rate us on Apple podcasts would love to know what you think.  Thank you for listening to our conversation today.  See you next time.

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